What is the Future of Adobe Flash?

Posted in Social Media, Web Design3 years ago • Written by 55 Comments

The fate of Adobe Flash is in a stir lately. Who wouldn’t talk about it when two Steve’s are out there to get it by the neck? Steve Jobs and Steve Ballmer have decided that Flash’s reign is over. At least in the sense that Microsoft and Apple and other major technology companies have started shifting from Flash to different platforms.

What’s in store for developers and users? Users would wonder if they’re affected by this change. Depending on what they use their devices for, it might make or break a lot of things. Take for example gamers. There are major gaming websites that focus on Flash like Kongregate and Newgrounds, I guess Apple users won’t be able to play games anymore. For developers, this might be a problem (or a business) as they will have to rewrite their products.

Apple is a behemoth that does not support Flash. Two Steve’s are actually moving away from Flash, the other Steve is Steve Ballmer, Microsoft’s CEO. Imagine that? Two huge industry giants versus Adobe Flash!

Is the future of Adobe Flash grim? Before addressing the real issue here, let’s first look at why Flash is a target and not others.

Why is Flash Widely Used?

Source: Adobe.com

To begin, Flash has been used for a very long time and has widely revolutionized multimedia both online and on handheld devices. Why is it so? Because Flash has solved several problems that people experienced. From handling videos to fonts, to animation and cross browser compatibility, and adding to that the set standards on the web that are always changing. Cross browser and cross-platform compatibility with Adobe Flash is not an issue, unlike many web technologies like HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript.

Another reason for its success is that Flash is mostly used for gaming and entertainment. The majority of internet users use the internet for entertainment.

Is it the End of Flash?

No. To say that it will die off because a new challenger appears is too sensationalist. Since the majority of PCs use it, websites with animations including those pesky advertisements, and thousands of Flash games, it won’t go away easily. It has served thousands of devices and websites; taught in multimedia classes and has produced a lot of creative content without even knowing scripting. Adobe Flash is still evolving, trying to keep up with the fast paced technology.

During college I took a multimedia class. There we used Adobe Flash and created several 2D animations and Flash games. I can say that even if I’m not that good with graphics and design, I can sure as hell create a Flash game and animate your stick man. Is it a useful skill? Maybe it can get you a few ladies to drink with, still it is a very useful skill especially for designers.

So, what can turn the tables? I, for one, loathe the bulky Flash websites (especially those Hollywood film promotional websites), but when it comes to interactivity I’m the first one to worship it. A lightweight competitor like HTML5 will do the trick; CSS3, HTML, PHP5, JavaScript and others would win when it comes to creating dynamic websites.

The problem with these technologies is that the standards aren’t really that standard for everyone. You think you know everything about CSS and HTML and now you can create a super website? Think again. In a few months or years you’ll have to read another manual telling you that there’s another standard. Even if they’re called standards, developers from all over the planet are having difficulties with cross browser and cross platform compatibility.

Websites including YouTube have began using HTML5. There has been a spur of HTML5 games and they are really lightweight.

The question now is, is HTML5 (and others) easy to learn? I can teach a 13-year-old to animate using Flash, but not HTML5 just yet. It still has a long way to go but I’m pretty sure that someday people will come up with drag and drop applications to create rich and dynamic content.

As said, Flash is well-established and can be used by almost anyone.

What about the people saying that Flash is already dead? Are they too optimistic about HTML5? Maybe, since HTML5 still has a long way to go and still has to establish credibility. Something which Flash has. But HTML5 has the ace up its sleeve, and that is the potential to grow further.

What Apple says vs. What Adobe says

When it comes to Touch

Apple claims that Adobe Flash wasn’t made to support touch screen devices. Any other Flash applications and websites will then be rewritten.

Adobe says that the Adobe Flash Player is actually made for the purpose of supporting tablets with multi-touch. And that Flash developers need not worry because mouse events are automatically converted to touch events for touch devices.

When it comes to Battery Life

Apple says that Flash uses too much battery life to be used on mobile devices when playing high-definition videos or games.

Adobe says it will not be an issue since Flash Player 10.1 supports hardware acceleration across mobile and desktop devices.

When it comes to Security

Apple takes a hold of Symantec’s word about Flash being one of worst in security.

Adobe says it is also important to note that Flash is one of the most widely used systems. Comparing it to a discussion I had during college, Microsoft OS is mostly targeted by computer viruses and crackers because the market is in there, many people use it as compared to Linux and Mac OS X.

(see links at article’s end for an in-depth explanation from Adobe and Apple)

Should You Learn Flash?

HTML5 is the next big thing after Flash but do not expect a wide support group for it just yet. If you want to do complex animations, Flash is your way for now. By all means learn how to use Flash, it is widely supported and has lots of features that anyone can use.

But if you are thinking of creating a website with animations and things, you might want to wait just yet. Flash websites were superstars of the past, now they’re just divas that want attention and many people loathe them.

Flash is compatible with almost any browser. You don’t have to worry about cross browser and cross platforms. Of course, we’re not talking about iPhone and iPads. Kidding, Adobe Flash Player 10.1 supports them now.

Now, if you are thinking of creating an HTML5 game, you might not find a very good marketplace for it. Flash still has the biggest audience and established marketplaces for games like Y8, Newgrounds, and Kongregate.

Should you learn HTML5? Well, you can start now. It has a bright future, but don’t expect it to come in a sweep anytime soon. People, like an immune system, are resistive to change. HTML5 is still far from achieving what Flash can do: games, videos, applications, flexibility, and audience.

Weighing Things Up

Photo by darktaco

Adobe Flash wins at:

  • Used by almost every PC user.
  • Creation of simple to complex animation.
  • Bundled up; learning curve is easier because it’s not as diverse as learning HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript and other things.
  • Several thousand Flash games that can’t be played on Apple products.
  • Devices that allows Flash usage, in my experience, are more fun to deal with. My team and I once created a “hack and slash” game using Flash and we were stunned to learn that our professor saved it on his Nokia and played it there. Fully running. My point is, Flash is great with cross-platform compatibility.
  • Cross-browser compatibility too.

HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript wins at:

  • All of these are open standards, no more relying on third-party products like Flash does.
  • Can be used by most browsers without updating anything.
  • When YouTube was still a baby, I usually would see a page asking me to upgrade my Flash player. I haven’t seen it in a year now.
  • Adobe Flash wasn’t really built to support touch screen devices. With today’s technology, almost every surface is a touch screen. It doesn’t stop there; the juice of this all is on the web. Little by little desktop applications are leaving the mainstream and are replaced by web-based applications. Lightweight and accessible almost anywhere. This includes games, videos, and other applications.

Conclusion

It is not certain if Flash will be replaced, but it is certain that in the years to come there will be other technologies that will be on par with it. Flash was, and is still, hot because of PCs. In an era where PCs are common household items, Flash sure has found its place. But with today’s rise in mobile devices, lightweight devices, the hassles of using Flash applications will be its own funeral. Even though its future is gravely marked, it doesn’t mean it will fall overnight. There’s still hope for Flash developers out there.

Sources and for Further Reading:

Adobe - The truth about Flash

Apple - Thoughts on Flash

Tell us what you think!

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Rean is the editor of 1stwebdesigner. He regularly writes about freelancing, technology, web design, and web development. Rean also writes at Moneyarty.com, a blog dedicated to teaching people how to make money online.

55 Comments Best Comments First
  • Audas

    Monday, June 13th, 2011 15:05

    21

    Firstly a disclosure – I have been coding with html, javascript, css, php, xml etc, etc for almost fifteen years, have been coding in flash for 12 years, have advanced degrees in visual communications, work with all major graphics apps, including photoshop etc Have worked with dozens of the worlds largest corporations and have done so both as freelancer and in house for
    the worlds largest and best known agencies.

    Your article and understanding of flash is almost pure ignorance. I know thats hard – you probably fell you have some understanding – I am only writing this because I am sick and tired of reading the most ignorant drivel immaginable on the web. So here is a response to some of your – well – crap.

    How has microsoft moved away from flash ?

    The issues which flash solved are still present.
    animation, video, cross browser and gaming.

    By PC’s you mean every desktop computer, including linux, all smart phones and tablets except iPhone and iPad.

    Flash also being shipped on tvs and web boxes.

    Flash is not trying to keep up – flash is the bench mark – evrything else is trying to keep up.

    Your comments regarding dynamic interactive immerse websites are nothing short of complete garbage. sorry –

    You state that you hate these sites but not if done with html5 and css etc, because they are light weight ?!!

    My god, you know nothing, absolutely nothing about flash. Firstly flash is faster, by MILES, nothing can compete with it, by nothing I mean NOTHING comes close for compact efficient code to deliver these types of sites.

    Trying to deliver them with html5 and css is quite frankly sheer bloody minded stupidity.

    The flash player executing pure flash code will always be vastly better than your mish mash of mark up codes – saying otherwiwe is nothing other than stupid.

    You really have no idea where flash is do you. flash is incredibly complicated – i mean mental. You seriously think some of the ridiculous games seen in html are comparing to flash at full throttle – including direct peer to peer, Alchemy with c++ libraries, streaming with incredibly advanced media technologies, 3D integration, etc, etc, but yeah, html and javascript is harder – how incredibly ridiculous.

    Yeah anyone can learn flash – you mean sketching on a stage ?! Again, you do not understand what flash is beyond the most basic concept – as you said stick men in a bar.

    Please tell me – was html made for touch devices ? No. was html made for animation or video ? No. HTML, css was made for marking up text.

    Every demonstration on the web with html5 destroys the ipad – woooah well done steve.

    As for security, lets see, the annual hackers conference always starts with Safari – because its the easiest to hack, secondly almost all attacks via the browser DO NOT COME THROUGH FLASH – do they. No, they dont. In fact this years hackers conference demonstrates the calculator being launched within minutes.

    Flash web sites with fancy animations are just Divas, so wait and then do them with html5 – because then they arent Divas anymore they’re really super cool ? How stupid is that. Seriously. What a totally stupid stupid thing to write.

    In fact your best option for delivering complicated websites – especially with highly complex data is definitely flash. Thats exactly why so many applications and highly complex web sites, especially internal corporate websites are delivered with flash – its called FLEX, seriously you make your self look really, bloody stupid by saying this. Data through flash IS EXACTLY WHERE IT IS GOING AND WHERE IT IS AT – go do some research.

    Full websites done in flex take almost no time and would be the best choice for anyone.

    Flash is ten times harder to learn than html, css and javascript END OF STORY. Why ? Well to code flash you need all of those technologies as a sub set of flash, including half a dozen more. Be honest whats your object oriented, design pattern driven coding like – ….thought so.

    Several thousand flash games – are you serious ? WOW – try several hundreds of thousands. I’ve probably coded well over two hundred on my own – Im one of millions of flashers……seriously.

    HTML5, CSS, javascript rely on Safari, Explorer, Chrome and FFox …aren’t coders entirely reliant on the whims of these bohemoths, isnt that reliance and their lack of coordination exaclty why flash gained hold ? How is their fractured proprietary monopoly ok but the open source flash player NOT ok ? Can anyone else have input ? No, is it open source ? No.

    Your youtube flash player no longer needs updateing because it no longer requires updating – flash updates automatically – oops. You are rarely using the html5 player, in fact probably never. Even then – did you have to upgrade your browser to get html5 video ? Yes you did.

    HTML wasn’t developed for touch either. Flash is much better suited to take advantage of multi touch – already been proven dozens of times and is much more powerful in this respect with much better touch recognition capabilities already implemented. OOPS !!! Flash has also been a specialised app product for almost 8 years, with north code and MDM studio, flash projectors etc and now with the hugely popular adobe air runtime – now being delivered in your TV, car, set top box, dvd, hdd, oil tankers, oil pipe line dials, medical equipment, heads up displays, gaming consols, etc, etc, etc. In fact, flash has pretty much always been used as the choice for distributable code for product demos etc for over a decade.

    OOPS !!

    Flash is so much more efficient and powerful than anything you are proposing, you look completely out of your depth even considering otherwise. Almost every single serious html5 demo which has tried to even touch the most outer peripheries of what flash is capable of fails in
    CPU explosions. yes – even with hardware acceleration.

    Flash molehill demos are simply mind numbing, stunning animations of massive complexity the likes I have never even seen (infinity aside) – with the CPU not even measuring a blip. Nothing. This includes several 2d libraries which have already been built and are being used in the community.

    The truth about this ongoing argument is that most people, like you, who comment on this issue really have absolutely no idea, think they have it all nailed down, but really have no clue. The comments on these articles usually confirm this.

    Almost every single person I have ever come across who hates flash is because they were not capable of dealing with its complexity. seriously – you know its true.

    Time to go out and really learn the truth about flash.

    Am happy to answer and follow up on any of these issues – you have my email.

    +10
    • Albert

      Friday, August 26th, 2011 22:42

      34

      +10. Excellent.

      0
    • Lars

      Thursday, December 15th, 2011 18:50

      43

      Well said, Audas. Any web developer worth his salt knows everything you said is true.

      0
    • Rean John Uehara

      Monday, June 13th, 2011 18:10

      20

      Believe me, sir, I have written a witty remark just for you directly on the dashboard but my cat erased it and now CTRL+Z can’t help. The gist is, please read the news about Adobe Flash’s security issues, Microsoft’s thoughts about HTML5, W3C’s releases on HTML5 (you’ll be amazed). Be sure to also read czery‘s comments. My IQ won’t even make a respectable earthquake but I can tell that Flash is easier to learn than HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, and others (czery explains it well, if you care to read what he/she said). Regarding Flash’s speed, I’m sorry that not all people have the same internet speed as you have. And if you happen to care, I made one Flash game and I’m [censored] proud of it. No, I won’t share its awesomeness. Your comment/rant is an interesting read and I’m handsomely sure that people will find the need to contact you for a follow up, would you mind me sharing your e-mail to them in case someone asks? I really don’t have time right now to address your comment entirely, but I will soon – if I fancy it. In any case, thanks for the comment!

      0
      • kstagg

        Thursday, June 16th, 2011 21:18

        28

        “…handsomely sure…” – what the heck?

        “Flash is easier to learn than HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, and others…”
        Sure it is. Let’s see you try and learn ActionScripting.

        The sheer ignorance in this article is mindboggling.

        +1
      • Audas

        Tuesday, June 14th, 2011 09:20

        23

        Ok – one more time – I have been working with flash, html, css and javascript for over 15 years – you haven’t – you even admit to it, so your not a judge and shouldn’t even passing comment on weather flash is easier or not. Your claim is utterly ridiculous – not just a little bit, or slightly off the mark, but totally and completely wrong.

        Html – mark up language – is fundamental to flash – in fact my man, so is css and javascript (Along with php (actionscript message format), xml, mxml), then there are languages used for Pixel Bender Filters, oh and lets not forget the molehill 3D API language construct – mind blowing – hard stuff. All of these are sub sets of flash (javascript and html are direct languages in Adobe Air Apps, javascript in flash internal functions, and of course javascript in the external interface api). All of this before we even start to get into the complexity of programming with Action script – which is, beyond any question, more complicated than javacscript as it is simply a far more robust language. This is all before we even commence getting into the areas of streaming, remoting, cold fusion integration, flex, Alchemy, Cirrus (stratus) etc. All of which are integral to flash.

        I have no idea what your reference is to flash’ speed, however it looks like you have again made an ass of yourself – if you are referring to bandwidth then there is absolutely no difference between flash and any other application on the internet, simply because I load a video, image, text, xml, soap, 3D object etc through flash does not somehow magically make it cost more bandwidth now does it ? Simply because I am using code to animate it does not mean it costs more bandwidth than the same code required to animate it in javascript etc. No it bloody well does not. Flash is only as big, or as small as the media it is working with and the code that is manipulating that media – sorry but thats just how it works. The fact that flash is a specialised animation plug in which is highly optimised for animation also means it is vastly better suited to animation than anything html is going to offer.

        Oh and since your being so ignorant and cocky here is a FLASH GAME BEING SHOWCASED BY APPLE FOR THE IOS on ITUNES – ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhh yeahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh !!! Giggidy gigitty !!!

        Do you like apples ?
        http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pyramix/id440405661?mt=8

        how do you like THEM APPLES ?

        +2
    • Rindra

      Tuesday, June 28th, 2011 00:59

      30

      I agree with everything you said. Not sure if you’ll read this but i’d love to view your work or connect with you via twitter if you like. Again just want to show my support, and unfortunately i have to say ‘support’ because even if true flash developers know what Flash is really capable of, Apple’s politic definitely tarnished Flash’s image. And a lot of Flash developers are suffering from it!

      +1
    • david

      Wednesday, December 28th, 2011 22:40

      45

      maybe you should get rantman to help you rewrite this article. he sounds like he’s got much more knowledge than you & lots of other people who’ve been saying stuff about flash lately (including that dead guy from apple)

      on your own u can only say (relatively) shallow stuff like most article writers. & his own he’s just some angry dude who’s kinda funny but who most people won’t (or can’t) listen to for very long

      but together…. you could make beautiful music?

      +1
    • kstagg

      Thursday, June 16th, 2011 21:19

      29

      Thanks for the replies Audas. I appreciate the dose of clarity to this article.

      +2
    • Robert

      Sunday, January 22nd, 2012 12:25

      46

      Audas…
      This is all a spicey conversation. We all have our degree of knowledge and we all could potentially have looked at details others could have overlooked, so potentially we can all learn from eachother.

      For own progress it is best to stay open for that. An older, wise and experienced man, would be exceptionally wise if he’s open to learn a lesson or two from a four year old.

      If he has exceptionally specialized knowledge about something, he can be happy and greatfull to have made it this far and he would be wise to try to teach without attempts to humiliate and blow someone who has less knowledge away with its almighty presence.

      You see, we are all the same and evenly valuable. We are all working hard to get out what is in the seed. We all have our potential we like to see realized, but it may be vulnerable to negative impressions by such verbal violent treatment like you give, so that efforts to bring the potential out might be forced back.

      Someone who has the courage to start a conversation, is exposing himself, making him vulnerable, showing his strong points and also flaws in his knowledge. Do not punish someone for that! Don’t try to destroy someones attempts to express himself but encourage it! I can call you names for that but i like to practice wisdom.

      Faith and confidence is precisious and valuable to someone to maybe one day bring it as far as you in this very interesing field of interest. Or is there some dark hidden ugly instinctive reason, to keep the small ones small and not encouraging their growth?

      Rean John Uehara…
      Thanks a lot for starting this topic.
      I haven’t really programmed the web for years. But I am about to pick it up again. I came to this discussion via Google in evaluating what would be the most beneficail browser capabilities extending technology to put in my time.

      Audas, also thank you for your valuable comments, though I had to filter out from the humiliating crap no-one could ever progress on. Also everyone else in the field who added comments, thanks a lot, it really helped me.

      +7
  • Fred

    Wednesday, November 30th, 2011 12:42

    40

    I’ve learned Flex six months ago by applying it in a project. My first one and not just a website – a live media application that involves PHP and Wowza Media Server at the back-end. I am 44 and I have never done programming before. Although I am an engineer, I used to be a hardware guy – no coding whatsoever. I wanted to work at home and have time for my family so I made a decision over Silverlight, JavaFX. FlashBuilder was the appropriate choice for me. Almost a year ago I heard of HTML5 but when I evaluated its video capabilities that immediately turned me off. Because of the on-going arguments on which one is better, it took me a while to start my project. I chose flash because I had very little time and patience to learn a groovy language. Flex has a very wide support base and there are a lot of examples out there.
    I guess my point is, I chose Flash because its practical to use. It’ll get food on the table for the next few years. And if its time to learn HTML5…well I have already proven I can learn fast! Right now I really don’t have any personal motivation or incentive to do so. The politics over who is better HTML5 or flash is like comparing a champ and a new boxer. Let the new one box for a few years and we’ll see how it performs. Until then…happy with Flex.

    +1
  • Chris

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 11:00

    14

    Something to point out:

    I use flash to compress AVI’s that I turn into screen savers of different resolutions using Visual Basic code and Java Script. I find Flash is so handy in saving disk space for installation requirements. Something I have never found in any other product yet for crisp video production. Goes good with Bryce 3D, Maya and 3D Studio Max as well.

    +1
  • faye

    Tuesday, January 24th, 2012 23:04

    47

    As an illustrator who simply wants to animate and produce illustrations that move – I just cant see any program that replaces it for the non coding creative at present. I have spent 3 months learning the basics of Flash and love it’s easy workability – and I have had a quick look at the new Adobe lab trial “Edge” program and it doesn’t seem to have any of the tools, features and interactivity with PS and Illustrator that make Flash such a creative and easy tool to use.
    If you don’t code and don’t want too – what’s out there in html5 world as a viable replacement program for animating illustrators/designers? Any ideas?

    0
  • Jay Karsandas

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 19:36

    16

    I still use flash though not as much as before. In my day job we still use flash on the homepage in banners but I’m starting to think to take it out and go for something else. Specially when I have to integrate it with the new google analytics code, which was a headache but got there in the end!!

    There is still room for flash, it’s been a great product but time waits for no one. So lets hope adobe get their act together because it would be a shame to lose what once was great.

    0
  • Jwo

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 14:11

    15

    Well written article, and believe there will be a future for Flash. Frankly, I think there’s been an over reaction to the thought that “Flash is dead.” It’s not dead. It’s not perfect of course, nor is it the obvious choice to do certain things like it used to be. I hope Adobe maintains it’s technical and developmental relevance, but it’s frankly, like all software dev platforms, that’s up to them. If they fail to do that, developers will migrate to better tools and solutions.

    Couple nick picks: You said “Apple is a behemoth that does not support Flash.” Apple does support Flash in it’s Mac OS, but not for it’s iOS. Also, the stability of Flash was one of Jobs’ big point about supporting it on iOS. He stated that it was the number one reason for a crash in Mac OS. And I realize the pissing match between who’s fault that really is still is debated. I frankly don’t think Flash’s stability issue it’s Mac-only. It’s true of any browser/OS. But my bigger point is stability is a growing issue with Adobe, especially over the last 10 years or so. Photoshop used to be rock solid prior to the Creative Suite era, and now it ranks up there as a less stable stand alone app. IMHO, their code isn’t as clean as it use to be. (Acrobat Pro footprint is ridiculously big – over a GB!) Their UI is a incredulously inconsistent across their so called Creative Suite. And I’m not even talking the awkward half-baked adoption of Macromedia products (including Flash of course). The core Adobe creative suite apps (InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop) still act more like separate stand alone apps than advertised. The icons all look alike…and we buy them all together, and there’s Bridge….but it’s not a true Suite.

    I love what Adobe apps, and what they can do for me, including Flash. I use to love them more when they were stable, and more thoughtfully and elegantly written.

    0
  • Michael Francis

    Monday, June 13th, 2011 01:37

    17

    Great information. It is always good to know the happenings in our industry. I use a little bit of flash, but I definitely haven’t mastered it yet. I’m kind of an html and images guy. KISS, keepin’ it short and simple. I still don’t want to see Flash go though! I hope they find a way to overcome the challenges they’ll be sure to face from the competition. But I’d still love to see other new ways to animate an interactive UI. Adobe will sill have lots of other products. Let’s watch…

    0
  • Venky

    Monday, June 13th, 2011 17:56

    18

    Whoa… the article and the first comment was rocking… Although some of the points mentioned in the main article is true, I believe that the info mentioned in the first comment by Audas holds more technical relevance. The fact that Steve Jobs denied support for Flash was only on iOS for iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch. And practically everywhere else, Flash/Flex still holds the fort.

    In the past few years, there have been competitors like Silverlight, JavaFX and OpenLaszlo. Off these three, only Silverlight came a distant second. Probably the race was more like the race of browsers in the 90′s between IE and rest of the world (or probably this was even worse). Even today Silverlight is the only so-called competition for the Flash platform.

    HTML5 is a distant dream. And although there are well-defined standards, I am not sure how many years will it take for all the browsers to support all the features. And till that happens, we are still stuck in the “cross-browser-compatibilty” issue. And even when every browser supports it and assuming that one code will work on ALL browsers, still it may happen that (hypothetically) Chrome supports 95% of the features, Firefox supports 80% and IE supports 70%. So we are left with the option to use on 70% of HTML5. How ridiculous!

    I agree that Flash has not been able to gain its supremacy on mobile platforms. But for that case which platform has done it? Its not that you write something for iOS and that will work on Android, Windows Mobile or Symbian. Each of these mobile platforms have their own coding standards and styles. So even in that sense, Flash is present in all of these platforms except iOS. So how is Flash lagging behind?

    Flash or Flex is far from being dead. It will take ages till something like that can probably even happen. But Adobe is not sitting idle. They know they are the leaders and they are acting like ones… And I am pretty sure that there is no technology in the market that can dethrone Flash for the next 5-6 years AT LEAST!

    0
    • Lars

      Thursday, December 15th, 2011 18:40

      42

      Very well said. I’m a web developer, and I agree with you 100%.

      0
    • Venky

      Monday, June 13th, 2011 17:58

      19

      Ohh when I said first comment, I meant the comment by “Audas”… I thought new comments are added at the bottom!

      0
  • Sherry

    Thursday, April 19th, 2012 13:11

    54

    Are we forgetting that Flash CREATES content FOR iOS in the form of apps?

    0
    • Dainis Graveris

      Thursday, April 19th, 2012 15:21

      55

      Sherry, where exactly you see Flash used in iOS?

      0
  • Malcolm Graham

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 06:49

    12

    I think Flash will die out for 2 reasons 1) Apple 2) Search Engines. Those are two very big reasons, by the way :)

    0
    • Rochester Oliveira

      Thursday, June 16th, 2011 21:57

      27

      Agreed.

      0
    • Lee

      Thursday, November 10th, 2011 08:51

      35

      I don’t think SEO is an issue any longer in killing Flash. Google has already updated their spiders over a year ago to interpret and index textual content within .swf files. It seems to be working too.

      0
    • Prz

      Monday, November 21st, 2011 19:27

      39

      Apple and its products are just a trend. Their real genius Steve is gone and so will their political rants in the next 2 years. Google updates their engines for Flash to work great when it comes to SEOs. Try creating this simple task in a couple of minutes using HTML –create a multi-level set of animations in different timelines per object. Let’s say bouncing balls popping out from nowhere in a box. Each of those balls has to change color everytime it hits the box and each ball has to glow whenever you click on it. Let’s see how you’ll hate or love Flash this time. You haven’t seen the real power of Flash yet especially the stability of AS3.

      0
  • czery

    Saturday, June 11th, 2011 12:42

    3

    By the way: There are a few good approaches for creating an HTML5 IDE like Tumult Inc.’s Hype (just OS X – Mac App Store) or Animatable (browser-based but not yet released – http://animatable.com/).

    0
  • czery

    Saturday, June 11th, 2011 12:39

    2

    Thanks for this great conclusion about the Flash vs. HTML5 topic. I read a lot about that in the past few weeks and I agree in most of the points you mention. But I think we have to differentiate between the technology itself and the development environment. Flash is both the technology but also the IDE, which allows to implement the technology very easily – and I agree that a clever 13-year-old could learn how to animate using the Flash IDE. However for me HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript are just the pure markup, layout description or scripting languages. So I think now it’s time for the software developers out there to create intuitive and easy to use IDEs for this languages to release their power and make them accessible to the non-programming designers and creative brains.

    0
    • Lee

      Thursday, November 10th, 2011 09:02

      36

      Nice of you to mention the Flash IDE. They have a long way to go in developing a rival development platform with SVGs, a graphical timeline integrated with scripting, vector tweens, etc. Flash is elegant. Also, too many designers such have myself, have worked long and hard at becoming fluent in the use of this IDE. So we’re not giving it up too easily.

      0
    • Rean John Uehara

      Saturday, June 11th, 2011 13:17

      5

      Really great link you shared on the other comment (Animatable), I’m excited to see more of it in the future. Aye, your comment is better than the conclusion I wrote, I must admit. Thanks!

      0
  • Bill Robbins

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 06:34

    7

    I’d be interested to know the percentage of the web sites above only use Flash for video or ads. Admittedly, I don’t play web based games so I rarely encounter Flash outside of video. If that’s all they need Flash for, swapping it for HTML5 video is easy.

    Personally for me, I’ve always loathed Flash from back in the day when it would take forever to load a full Flash site over a dial-up connection just to check a restaurant’s menu.

    0
    • kstagg

      Thursday, June 16th, 2011 21:15

      26

      “Personally for me, I’ve always loathed Flash from back in the day when it would take forever to load a full Flash site over a dial-up connection just to check a restaurant’s menu.”

      You’re referencing coding practices from the days of dial-up to today? Oh, come-on. Look at the stats at the top of this article, that will tell you what Flash is used for. Flash is a great tool, and for me, has always been stable, whether on my humble, dual-core 32-bit Windows 7 system at home or on my EVO 4G.

      It’s great knowing I can embed a flash element on a page knowing it will look the same in every browser. It’s a shame that the so-called monster machines from Apple can’t handle what my 3-yr old Windows hardware can do. Bummer.

      0
    • Lars

      Thursday, December 15th, 2011 18:57

      44

      “Personally for me, I’ve always loathed Flash from back in the day when it would take forever to load a full Flash site over a dial-up connection just to check a restaurant’s menu.”

      Yeah, and my great grandfather hated cars because they used to scare his horses. Thanks for the nostalgic trip. Just FYI… it’s 2012.

      0
  • Frederic

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 10:43

    11

    With AIR making an app programming so easy, and Molehill that will bring 3D with GPU acceleration in our browsers, and phones, Flash will be here for a long time.
    It is improving fast, finding some new ways and reasons to be here, in spite of it’s defects (search engine)
    Expect it to be in your phones, tvs, tablets, laptops and more in the near and far future.

    HTML5 will take more time to install in the market. The codecs wars is still here, the canvas perfs are horrible on phones and tablets, even the apple ones. Sure it will improve too, but only future will tell us if it’ll egal flash perfs.

    Today, Flash is still the best choice for :
    - Using the same code to make an app, then bring it to android, then to iphone, then in a tv, with a really small time
    - Making games (Accelerated graphics !);

    And today, HTML5 is the best choice for :
    - videos;
    -making website’s menus that were made in flash yesterday.

    You know what ? I think it will stay this way.

    0
  • Gabriel

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 04:16

    10

    Too bad, because I love to use the flash on my web sites … But new technologies make their way so we have to accept …

    Gabriel

    0
    • Stanley

      Sunday, June 12th, 2011 08:23

      13

      Yes agree. Me too is Flash addict and with the invention of Apple products, we moved to jQuery. This is the best thing of Web industry… Everyday new thing will come… we have to adept to it.

      0
  • Ray

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 08:27

    9

    A couple of sites I belong to that develop software scripts have mentioned moving away from flash programming. Although they didn’t get into a lot of detail. Maybe there is a new trend brewing. I can live with or without flash. Sometimes it is kind of nice and cool, other times it can be annoying, use a lot of pc resources and even freeze up. I messed with some flash programming a few years ago, and I thought it was confusing. So I leave most of that programming stuff to the pro’s now. It has been so popular for so long now that I really don’t see it disappearing any time soon.

    0
  • Shelle

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 00:58

    8

    Interesting read :)
    Have to say, I have not used Flash in years, the main reason for this being a strong focus on meeting accessibility requirements for the online content I work on, and although Flash has come a long way to meeting these standards, I avoid using/developing in Flash for online content as I have found it too time consuming to either try and make Flash accessible and/or also provide an accessible alternative to the Flash utlisied.
    Maybe Flash will be here to stay, but I think it will end up having a specific market and purpose, as opposed to being widely utilised as it has been in the past.

    0
  • Peter

    Monday, March 19th, 2012 17:03

    53

    Flash may have no future for building websites, which is something that I agree with, but in my opinion it will definitely not die. HTML5 is a way to go, especially in terms of web development. For animation and games, Flash is still the king.

    0
  • Derek

    Wednesday, June 15th, 2011 12:58

    24

    Flash will be on the market. Almost all advertising banners a created on it.

    0
  • pep

    Tuesday, February 14th, 2012 19:41

    50

    … But you have to code, otherwise what is ActionScript for?

    0
  • Harbo

    Tuesday, November 15th, 2011 00:16

    38

    Flash developers need to learn AS3 and start using AIR and/or Flex too.. also learning a server-side script like PHP or other languages is a good idea to survive. And developers should only use Flash where it’s use can be justified… don’t do what printed paper or HTML already does! Now let’s all go do some awesome solutions and hopefully Flash will be here for years to come…

    0
  • Jack

    Monday, December 5th, 2011 14:13

    41

    This is so true… Dick heads think they are smarter and believe the hype. They have no clue how would HTML5 behave when it tries to replicate complex animation flash does..

    0
  • John

    Sunday, January 29th, 2012 13:48

    48

    I spent around 5 hours trying to put together a simple animation with the chain command in JQuery. It didn’t work, the ‘tutorial’ that I was following gave a simple example but anything a little bit more complex wasn’t handled properly. A similar animation took 5 minutes in flash. I think Html 5 will be pretty much the same, that is around thirty bloggers ‘talking’ about a piece of code that does a specific task with forty to fifty comments and two thousand people downloading the zips for their own projects. I also think that Flash would have developed more if Macromedia had kept it instead of selling to Adobe. But to say that Flash is dead is an uninformed statement when you consider the main format on You Tube for tubes is the .flv format

    0
  • faye

    Sunday, January 29th, 2012 22:30

    49

    As an illustrator who simply wants to animate and produce illustrations that move – I just cant see any program that replaces it for the non coding creative at present. I have spent 3 months learning the basics of Flash and love it’s easy workability – and I have had a quick look at the new Adobe lab trial “Edge” program and it doesn’t seem to have any of the tools, features and interactivity with PS and Illustrator that make Flash such a creative and easy tool to use.
    If you don’t code and don’t want too – what’s out there in html5 world as a viable replacement program for animating illustrators/designers? Any ideas?

    0
    • Jean

      Thursday, March 15th, 2012 19:30

      52

      I’m with you. Code is Greek to me. What will we do?

      0
  • Puhi

    Saturday, June 11th, 2011 12:21

    1

    No way Flash will die. You didn’t even touch the fact that it is being used in video games development – not Flash games, but triple A titles. For example, a whole UI for a game we’re developing will be developed in Flash.

    0
    • Rean John Uehara

      Saturday, June 11th, 2011 13:08

      4

      I must admit, I didn’t know Flash is used for console/hardcore games. I focused too much on the web. :D Thanks!

      0
      • Rochester Oliveira

        Sunday, June 12th, 2011 06:29

        6

        Let’s say instead: ‘Flash, as we know, for web, is dead’.

        There is a couple of products that reinvented their focus and are still alive..

        BTW, Really well written, Rean.

        []‘s

        0
  • artmax

    Thursday, June 16th, 2011 08:08

    25

    Flash died in 2000, 2004, 2008, and until now everything dies and die =). Perhaps flash is immortal.

    0
  • james sterling

    Thursday, February 16th, 2012 09:19

    51

    Audas, spot on,

    This article was painful to read, sophmoric, inept.
    Why is he talking about his ” college course ” , a “discussion ‘I’ had in college”.

    ‘Then I graduated to writing third rate fluff on the internet.’

    0
  • Arnold

    Monday, August 1st, 2011 14:51

    33

    nice article, for the web player.

    however like any other post, it touches only the surface of the flash platform. no one yet provided information on the entire platform. the development of the flash platform right now focuses more on multi-platform capabilities. the main goal is to have it run on multiple devices as speedy as possible. and so far they are doing a great job.

    the idea remains that you write 1 code and deploy it on, from web to smart TV. and this includes iPhones and iPads. so far, they are doing an excellent job with it. and it is by far the most widely used multi-platform technology available.

    the grim fact is, when it comes to mildly complex apps html, js, or even some native APIs just can’t deliver.

    0
  • Anakin Caden

    Thursday, June 30th, 2011 11:19

    32

    Adobe Flash has many benefits. It provides support for mobile devices , expanded options for high-quality media delivery, hardware acceleration , mobile-ready features for unprecedented creative control.

    0
  • paolo

    Wednesday, June 29th, 2011 18:15

    31

    First of all, like audas I have been coding with a lot of languages/tecnologies for almost fifteen years.
    I have to say that developement with flash is funny if you are the only one who works on that project. But team developement with flash is sometimes a mission impossibile. Obviously it’s depends on the project, the budget etc.
    Another thing not mentioned is the problem of flash (today still a problem) with the search engines. Customers start to understand (in their own way) the meaning of words like “well positioning” and “seo friendly” and we can’t sell them a flash website.
    It’s always funny to see this “wars of religion” such as flash vs html, windows vs mac, php vs the rest of the scripting languages…and more. They are just tools, we have to choose the right tool for our purposes.
    Who wrote this article talked about the FUTURE of flash, and if the web will still move in this direction, flash will probably die, because nowadays if a content is unreachable, is useless

    0
  • Sherry

    Thursday, April 19th, 2012 13:11

    54

    Are we forgetting that Flash CREATES content FOR iOS in the form of apps?

    0
    • Dainis Graveris

      Thursday, April 19th, 2012 15:21

      55

      Sherry, where exactly you see Flash used in iOS?

      0
  • Peter

    Monday, March 19th, 2012 17:03

    53

    Flash may have no future for building websites, which is something that I agree with, but in my opinion it will definitely not die. HTML5 is a way to go, especially in terms of web development. For animation and games, Flash is still the king.

    0
  • james sterling

    Thursday, February 16th, 2012 09:19

    51

    Audas, spot on,

    This article was painful to read, sophmoric, inept.
    Why is he talking about his ” college course ” , a “discussion ‘I’ had in college”.

    ‘Then I graduated to writing third rate fluff on the internet.’

    0
  • pep

    Tuesday, February 14th, 2012 19:41

    50

    … But you have to code, otherwise what is ActionScript for?

    0
  • faye

    Sunday, January 29th, 2012 22:30

    49

    As an illustrator who simply wants to animate and produce illustrations that move – I just cant see any program that replaces it for the non coding creative at present. I have spent 3 months learning the basics of Flash and love it’s easy workability – and I have had a quick look at the new Adobe lab trial “Edge” program and it doesn’t seem to have any of the tools, features and interactivity with PS and Illustrator that make Flash such a creative and easy tool to use.
    If you don’t code and don’t want too – what’s out there in html5 world as a viable replacement program for animating illustrators/designers? Any ideas?

    0
    • Jean

      Thursday, March 15th, 2012 19:30

      52

      I’m with you. Code is Greek to me. What will we do?

      0
  • John

    Sunday, January 29th, 2012 13:48

    48

    I spent around 5 hours trying to put together a simple animation with the chain command in JQuery. It didn’t work, the ‘tutorial’ that I was following gave a simple example but anything a little bit more complex wasn’t handled properly. A similar animation took 5 minutes in flash. I think Html 5 will be pretty much the same, that is around thirty bloggers ‘talking’ about a piece of code that does a specific task with forty to fifty comments and two thousand people downloading the zips for their own projects. I also think that Flash would have developed more if Macromedia had kept it instead of selling to Adobe. But to say that Flash is dead is an uninformed statement when you consider the main format on You Tube for tubes is the .flv format

    0
  • faye

    Tuesday, January 24th, 2012 23:04

    47

    As an illustrator who simply wants to animate and produce illustrations that move – I just cant see any program that replaces it for the non coding creative at present. I have spent 3 months learning the basics of Flash and love it’s easy workability – and I have had a quick look at the new Adobe lab trial “Edge” program and it doesn’t seem to have any of the tools, features and interactivity with PS and Illustrator that make Flash such a creative and easy tool to use.
    If you don’t code and don’t want too – what’s out there in html5 world as a viable replacement program for animating illustrators/designers? Any ideas?

    0
  • Jack

    Monday, December 5th, 2011 14:13

    41

    This is so true… Dick heads think they are smarter and believe the hype. They have no clue how would HTML5 behave when it tries to replicate complex animation flash does..

    0
  • Fred

    Wednesday, November 30th, 2011 12:42

    40

    I’ve learned Flex six months ago by applying it in a project. My first one and not just a website – a live media application that involves PHP and Wowza Media Server at the back-end. I am 44 and I have never done programming before. Although I am an engineer, I used to be a hardware guy – no coding whatsoever. I wanted to work at home and have time for my family so I made a decision over Silverlight, JavaFX. FlashBuilder was the appropriate choice for me. Almost a year ago I heard of HTML5 but when I evaluated its video capabilities that immediately turned me off. Because of the on-going arguments on which one is better, it took me a while to start my project. I chose flash because I had very little time and patience to learn a groovy language. Flex has a very wide support base and there are a lot of examples out there.
    I guess my point is, I chose Flash because its practical to use. It’ll get food on the table for the next few years. And if its time to learn HTML5…well I have already proven I can learn fast! Right now I really don’t have any personal motivation or incentive to do so. The politics over who is better HTML5 or flash is like comparing a champ and a new boxer. Let the new one box for a few years and we’ll see how it performs. Until then…happy with Flex.

    +1
  • Harbo

    Tuesday, November 15th, 2011 00:16

    38

    Flash developers need to learn AS3 and start using AIR and/or Flex too.. also learning a server-side script like PHP or other languages is a good idea to survive. And developers should only use Flash where it’s use can be justified… don’t do what printed paper or HTML already does! Now let’s all go do some awesome solutions and hopefully Flash will be here for years to come…

    0
  • Arnold

    Monday, August 1st, 2011 14:51

    33

    nice article, for the web player.

    however like any other post, it touches only the surface of the flash platform. no one yet provided information on the entire platform. the development of the flash platform right now focuses more on multi-platform capabilities. the main goal is to have it run on multiple devices as speedy as possible. and so far they are doing a great job.

    the idea remains that you write 1 code and deploy it on, from web to smart TV. and this includes iPhones and iPads. so far, they are doing an excellent job with it. and it is by far the most widely used multi-platform technology available.

    the grim fact is, when it comes to mildly complex apps html, js, or even some native APIs just can’t deliver.

    0
  • Anakin Caden

    Thursday, June 30th, 2011 11:19

    32

    Adobe Flash has many benefits. It provides support for mobile devices , expanded options for high-quality media delivery, hardware acceleration , mobile-ready features for unprecedented creative control.

    0
  • paolo

    Wednesday, June 29th, 2011 18:15

    31

    First of all, like audas I have been coding with a lot of languages/tecnologies for almost fifteen years.
    I have to say that developement with flash is funny if you are the only one who works on that project. But team developement with flash is sometimes a mission impossibile. Obviously it’s depends on the project, the budget etc.
    Another thing not mentioned is the problem of flash (today still a problem) with the search engines. Customers start to understand (in their own way) the meaning of words like “well positioning” and “seo friendly” and we can’t sell them a flash website.
    It’s always funny to see this “wars of religion” such as flash vs html, windows vs mac, php vs the rest of the scripting languages…and more. They are just tools, we have to choose the right tool for our purposes.
    Who wrote this article talked about the FUTURE of flash, and if the web will still move in this direction, flash will probably die, because nowadays if a content is unreachable, is useless

    0
  • artmax

    Thursday, June 16th, 2011 08:08

    25

    Flash died in 2000, 2004, 2008, and until now everything dies and die =). Perhaps flash is immortal.

    0
  • Derek

    Wednesday, June 15th, 2011 12:58

    24

    Flash will be on the market. Almost all advertising banners a created on it.

    0
  • Audas

    Monday, June 13th, 2011 15:05

    21

    Firstly a disclosure – I have been coding with html, javascript, css, php, xml etc, etc for almost fifteen years, have been coding in flash for 12 years, have advanced degrees in visual communications, work with all major graphics apps, including photoshop etc Have worked with dozens of the worlds largest corporations and have done so both as freelancer and in house for
    the worlds largest and best known agencies.

    Your article and understanding of flash is almost pure ignorance. I know thats hard – you probably fell you have some understanding – I am only writing this because I am sick and tired of reading the most ignorant drivel immaginable on the web. So here is a response to some of your – well – crap.

    How has microsoft moved away from flash ?

    The issues which flash solved are still present.
    animation, video, cross browser and gaming.

    By PC’s you mean every desktop computer, including linux, all smart phones and tablets except iPhone and iPad.

    Flash also being shipped on tvs and web boxes.

    Flash is not trying to keep up – flash is the bench mark – evrything else is trying to keep up.

    Your comments regarding dynamic interactive immerse websites are nothing short of complete garbage. sorry –

    You state that you hate these sites but not if done with html5 and css etc, because they are light weight ?!!

    My god, you know nothing, absolutely nothing about flash. Firstly flash is faster, by MILES, nothing can compete with it, by nothing I mean NOTHING comes close for compact efficient code to deliver these types of sites.

    Trying to deliver them with html5 and css is quite frankly sheer bloody minded stupidity.

    The flash player executing pure flash code will always be vastly better than your mish mash of mark up codes – saying otherwiwe is nothing other than stupid.

    You really have no idea where flash is do you. flash is incredibly complicated – i mean mental. You seriously think some of the ridiculous games seen in html are comparing to flash at full throttle – including direct peer to peer, Alchemy with c++ libraries, streaming with incredibly advanced media technologies, 3D integration, etc, etc, but yeah, html and javascript is harder – how incredibly ridiculous.

    Yeah anyone can learn flash – you mean sketching on a stage ?! Again, you do not understand what flash is beyond the most basic concept – as you said stick men in a bar.

    Please tell me – was html made for touch devices ? No. was html made for animation or video ? No. HTML, css was made for marking up text.

    Every demonstration on the web with html5 destroys the ipad – woooah well done steve.

    As for security, lets see, the annual hackers conference always starts with Safari – because its the easiest to hack, secondly almost all attacks via the browser DO NOT COME THROUGH FLASH – do they. No, they dont. In fact this years hackers conference demonstrates the calculator being launched within minutes.

    Flash web sites with fancy animations are just Divas, so wait and then do them with html5 – because then they arent Divas anymore they’re really super cool ? How stupid is that. Seriously. What a totally stupid stupid thing to write.

    In fact your best option for delivering complicated websites – especially with highly complex data is definitely flash. Thats exactly why so many applications and highly complex web sites, especially internal corporate websites are delivered with flash – its called FLEX, seriously you make your self look really, bloody stupid by saying this. Data through flash IS EXACTLY WHERE IT IS GOING AND WHERE IT IS AT – go do some research.

    Full websites done in flex take almost no time and would be the best choice for anyone.

    Flash is ten times harder to learn than html, css and javascript END OF STORY. Why ? Well to code flash you need all of those technologies as a sub set of flash, including half a dozen more. Be honest whats your object oriented, design pattern driven coding like – ….thought so.

    Several thousand flash games – are you serious ? WOW – try several hundreds of thousands. I’ve probably coded well over two hundred on my own – Im one of millions of flashers……seriously.

    HTML5, CSS, javascript rely on Safari, Explorer, Chrome and FFox …aren’t coders entirely reliant on the whims of these bohemoths, isnt that reliance and their lack of coordination exaclty why flash gained hold ? How is their fractured proprietary monopoly ok but the open source flash player NOT ok ? Can anyone else have input ? No, is it open source ? No.

    Your youtube flash player no longer needs updateing because it no longer requires updating – flash updates automatically – oops. You are rarely using the html5 player, in fact probably never. Even then – did you have to upgrade your browser to get html5 video ? Yes you did.

    HTML wasn’t developed for touch either. Flash is much better suited to take advantage of multi touch – already been proven dozens of times and is much more powerful in this respect with much better touch recognition capabilities already implemented. OOPS !!! Flash has also been a specialised app product for almost 8 years, with north code and MDM studio, flash projectors etc and now with the hugely popular adobe air runtime – now being delivered in your TV, car, set top box, dvd, hdd, oil tankers, oil pipe line dials, medical equipment, heads up displays, gaming consols, etc, etc, etc. In fact, flash has pretty much always been used as the choice for distributable code for product demos etc for over a decade.

    OOPS !!

    Flash is so much more efficient and powerful than anything you are proposing, you look completely out of your depth even considering otherwise. Almost every single serious html5 demo which has tried to even touch the most outer peripheries of what flash is capable of fails in
    CPU explosions. yes – even with hardware acceleration.

    Flash molehill demos are simply mind numbing, stunning animations of massive complexity the likes I have never even seen (infinity aside) – with the CPU not even measuring a blip. Nothing. This includes several 2d libraries which have already been built and are being used in the community.

    The truth about this ongoing argument is that most people, like you, who comment on this issue really have absolutely no idea, think they have it all nailed down, but really have no clue. The comments on these articles usually confirm this.

    Almost every single person I have ever come across who hates flash is because they were not capable of dealing with its complexity. seriously – you know its true.

    Time to go out and really learn the truth about flash.

    Am happy to answer and follow up on any of these issues – you have my email.

    +10
    • Rean John Uehara

      Monday, June 13th, 2011 18:10

      20

      Believe me, sir, I have written a witty remark just for you directly on the dashboard but my cat erased it and now CTRL+Z can’t help. The gist is, please read the news about Adobe Flash’s security issues, Microsoft’s thoughts about HTML5, W3C’s releases on HTML5 (you’ll be amazed). Be sure to also read czery‘s comments. My IQ won’t even make a respectable earthquake but I can tell that Flash is easier to learn than HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, and others (czery explains it well, if you care to read what he/she said). Regarding Flash’s speed, I’m sorry that not all people have the same internet speed as you have. And if you happen to care, I made one Flash game and I’m [censored] proud of it. No, I won’t share its awesomeness. Your comment/rant is an interesting read and I’m handsomely sure that people will find the need to contact you for a follow up, would you mind me sharing your e-mail to them in case someone asks? I really don’t have time right now to address your comment entirely, but I will soon – if I fancy it. In any case, thanks for the comment!

      0
      • Audas

        Tuesday, June 14th, 2011 09:20

        23

        Ok – one more time – I have been working with flash, html, css and javascript for over 15 years – you haven’t – you even admit to it, so your not a judge and shouldn’t even passing comment on weather flash is easier or not. Your claim is utterly ridiculous – not just a little bit, or slightly off the mark, but totally and completely wrong.

        Html – mark up language – is fundamental to flash – in fact my man, so is css and javascript (Along with php (actionscript message format), xml, mxml), then there are languages used for Pixel Bender Filters, oh and lets not forget the molehill 3D API language construct – mind blowing – hard stuff. All of these are sub sets of flash (javascript and html are direct languages in Adobe Air Apps, javascript in flash internal functions, and of course javascript in the external interface api). All of this before we even start to get into the complexity of programming with Action script – which is, beyond any question, more complicated than javacscript as it is simply a far more robust language. This is all before we even commence getting into the areas of streaming, remoting, cold fusion integration, flex, Alchemy, Cirrus (stratus) etc. All of which are integral to flash.

        I have no idea what your reference is to flash’ speed, however it looks like you have again made an ass of yourself – if you are referring to bandwidth then there is absolutely no difference between flash and any other application on the internet, simply because I load a video, image, text, xml, soap, 3D object etc through flash does not somehow magically make it cost more bandwidth now does it ? Simply because I am using code to animate it does not mean it costs more bandwidth than the same code required to animate it in javascript etc. No it bloody well does not. Flash is only as big, or as small as the media it is working with and the code that is manipulating that media – sorry but thats just how it works. The fact that flash is a specialised animation plug in which is highly optimised for animation also means it is vastly better suited to animation than anything html is going to offer.

        Oh and since your being so ignorant and cocky here is a FLASH GAME BEING SHOWCASED BY APPLE FOR THE IOS on ITUNES – ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhh yeahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh !!! Giggidy gigitty !!!

        Do you like apples ?
        http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pyramix/id440405661?mt=8

        how do you like THEM APPLES ?

        +2
      • kstagg

        Thursday, June 16th, 2011 21:18

        28

        “…handsomely sure…” – what the heck?

        “Flash is easier to learn than HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, and others…”
        Sure it is. Let’s see you try and learn ActionScripting.

        The sheer ignorance in this article is mindboggling.

        +1
    • kstagg

      Thursday, June 16th, 2011 21:19

      29

      Thanks for the replies Audas. I appreciate the dose of clarity to this article.

      +2
    • Rindra

      Tuesday, June 28th, 2011 00:59

      30

      I agree with everything you said. Not sure if you’ll read this but i’d love to view your work or connect with you via twitter if you like. Again just want to show my support, and unfortunately i have to say ‘support’ because even if true flash developers know what Flash is really capable of, Apple’s politic definitely tarnished Flash’s image. And a lot of Flash developers are suffering from it!

      +1
    • Albert

      Friday, August 26th, 2011 22:42

      34

      +10. Excellent.

      0
    • Lars

      Thursday, December 15th, 2011 18:50

      43

      Well said, Audas. Any web developer worth his salt knows everything you said is true.

      0
    • david

      Wednesday, December 28th, 2011 22:40

      45

      maybe you should get rantman to help you rewrite this article. he sounds like he’s got much more knowledge than you & lots of other people who’ve been saying stuff about flash lately (including that dead guy from apple)

      on your own u can only say (relatively) shallow stuff like most article writers. & his own he’s just some angry dude who’s kinda funny but who most people won’t (or can’t) listen to for very long

      but together…. you could make beautiful music?

      +1
    • Robert

      Sunday, January 22nd, 2012 12:25

      46

      Audas…
      This is all a spicey conversation. We all have our degree of knowledge and we all could potentially have looked at details others could have overlooked, so potentially we can all learn from eachother.

      For own progress it is best to stay open for that. An older, wise and experienced man, would be exceptionally wise if he’s open to learn a lesson or two from a four year old.

      If he has exceptionally specialized knowledge about something, he can be happy and greatfull to have made it this far and he would be wise to try to teach without attempts to humiliate and blow someone who has less knowledge away with its almighty presence.

      You see, we are all the same and evenly valuable. We are all working hard to get out what is in the seed. We all have our potential we like to see realized, but it may be vulnerable to negative impressions by such verbal violent treatment like you give, so that efforts to bring the potential out might be forced back.

      Someone who has the courage to start a conversation, is exposing himself, making him vulnerable, showing his strong points and also flaws in his knowledge. Do not punish someone for that! Don’t try to destroy someones attempts to express himself but encourage it! I can call you names for that but i like to practice wisdom.

      Faith and confidence is precisious and valuable to someone to maybe one day bring it as far as you in this very interesing field of interest. Or is there some dark hidden ugly instinctive reason, to keep the small ones small and not encouraging their growth?

      Rean John Uehara…
      Thanks a lot for starting this topic.
      I haven’t really programmed the web for years. But I am about to pick it up again. I came to this discussion via Google in evaluating what would be the most beneficail browser capabilities extending technology to put in my time.

      Audas, also thank you for your valuable comments, though I had to filter out from the humiliating crap no-one could ever progress on. Also everyone else in the field who added comments, thanks a lot, it really helped me.

      +7
  • Venky

    Monday, June 13th, 2011 17:56

    18

    Whoa… the article and the first comment was rocking… Although some of the points mentioned in the main article is true, I believe that the info mentioned in the first comment by Audas holds more technical relevance. The fact that Steve Jobs denied support for Flash was only on iOS for iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch. And practically everywhere else, Flash/Flex still holds the fort.

    In the past few years, there have been competitors like Silverlight, JavaFX and OpenLaszlo. Off these three, only Silverlight came a distant second. Probably the race was more like the race of browsers in the 90′s between IE and rest of the world (or probably this was even worse). Even today Silverlight is the only so-called competition for the Flash platform.

    HTML5 is a distant dream. And although there are well-defined standards, I am not sure how many years will it take for all the browsers to support all the features. And till that happens, we are still stuck in the “cross-browser-compatibilty” issue. And even when every browser supports it and assuming that one code will work on ALL browsers, still it may happen that (hypothetically) Chrome supports 95% of the features, Firefox supports 80% and IE supports 70%. So we are left with the option to use on 70% of HTML5. How ridiculous!

    I agree that Flash has not been able to gain its supremacy on mobile platforms. But for that case which platform has done it? Its not that you write something for iOS and that will work on Android, Windows Mobile or Symbian. Each of these mobile platforms have their own coding standards and styles. So even in that sense, Flash is present in all of these platforms except iOS. So how is Flash lagging behind?

    Flash or Flex is far from being dead. It will take ages till something like that can probably even happen. But Adobe is not sitting idle. They know they are the leaders and they are acting like ones… And I am pretty sure that there is no technology in the market that can dethrone Flash for the next 5-6 years AT LEAST!

    0
    • Venky

      Monday, June 13th, 2011 17:58

      19

      Ohh when I said first comment, I meant the comment by “Audas”… I thought new comments are added at the bottom!

      0
    • Lars

      Thursday, December 15th, 2011 18:40

      42

      Very well said. I’m a web developer, and I agree with you 100%.

      0
  • Michael Francis

    Monday, June 13th, 2011 01:37

    17

    Great information. It is always good to know the happenings in our industry. I use a little bit of flash, but I definitely haven’t mastered it yet. I’m kind of an html and images guy. KISS, keepin’ it short and simple. I still don’t want to see Flash go though! I hope they find a way to overcome the challenges they’ll be sure to face from the competition. But I’d still love to see other new ways to animate an interactive UI. Adobe will sill have lots of other products. Let’s watch…

    0
  • Jay Karsandas

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 19:36

    16

    I still use flash though not as much as before. In my day job we still use flash on the homepage in banners but I’m starting to think to take it out and go for something else. Specially when I have to integrate it with the new google analytics code, which was a headache but got there in the end!!

    There is still room for flash, it’s been a great product but time waits for no one. So lets hope adobe get their act together because it would be a shame to lose what once was great.

    0
  • Jwo

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 14:11

    15

    Well written article, and believe there will be a future for Flash. Frankly, I think there’s been an over reaction to the thought that “Flash is dead.” It’s not dead. It’s not perfect of course, nor is it the obvious choice to do certain things like it used to be. I hope Adobe maintains it’s technical and developmental relevance, but it’s frankly, like all software dev platforms, that’s up to them. If they fail to do that, developers will migrate to better tools and solutions.

    Couple nick picks: You said “Apple is a behemoth that does not support Flash.” Apple does support Flash in it’s Mac OS, but not for it’s iOS. Also, the stability of Flash was one of Jobs’ big point about supporting it on iOS. He stated that it was the number one reason for a crash in Mac OS. And I realize the pissing match between who’s fault that really is still is debated. I frankly don’t think Flash’s stability issue it’s Mac-only. It’s true of any browser/OS. But my bigger point is stability is a growing issue with Adobe, especially over the last 10 years or so. Photoshop used to be rock solid prior to the Creative Suite era, and now it ranks up there as a less stable stand alone app. IMHO, their code isn’t as clean as it use to be. (Acrobat Pro footprint is ridiculously big – over a GB!) Their UI is a incredulously inconsistent across their so called Creative Suite. And I’m not even talking the awkward half-baked adoption of Macromedia products (including Flash of course). The core Adobe creative suite apps (InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop) still act more like separate stand alone apps than advertised. The icons all look alike…and we buy them all together, and there’s Bridge….but it’s not a true Suite.

    I love what Adobe apps, and what they can do for me, including Flash. I use to love them more when they were stable, and more thoughtfully and elegantly written.

    0
  • Chris

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 11:00

    14

    Something to point out:

    I use flash to compress AVI’s that I turn into screen savers of different resolutions using Visual Basic code and Java Script. I find Flash is so handy in saving disk space for installation requirements. Something I have never found in any other product yet for crisp video production. Goes good with Bryce 3D, Maya and 3D Studio Max as well.

    +1
  • Malcolm Graham

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 06:49

    12

    I think Flash will die out for 2 reasons 1) Apple 2) Search Engines. Those are two very big reasons, by the way :)

    0
    • Rochester Oliveira

      Thursday, June 16th, 2011 21:57

      27

      Agreed.

      0
    • Lee

      Thursday, November 10th, 2011 08:51

      35

      I don’t think SEO is an issue any longer in killing Flash. Google has already updated their spiders over a year ago to interpret and index textual content within .swf files. It seems to be working too.

      0
    • Prz

      Monday, November 21st, 2011 19:27

      39

      Apple and its products are just a trend. Their real genius Steve is gone and so will their political rants in the next 2 years. Google updates their engines for Flash to work great when it comes to SEOs. Try creating this simple task in a couple of minutes using HTML –create a multi-level set of animations in different timelines per object. Let’s say bouncing balls popping out from nowhere in a box. Each of those balls has to change color everytime it hits the box and each ball has to glow whenever you click on it. Let’s see how you’ll hate or love Flash this time. You haven’t seen the real power of Flash yet especially the stability of AS3.

      0
  • Frederic

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 10:43

    11

    With AIR making an app programming so easy, and Molehill that will bring 3D with GPU acceleration in our browsers, and phones, Flash will be here for a long time.
    It is improving fast, finding some new ways and reasons to be here, in spite of it’s defects (search engine)
    Expect it to be in your phones, tvs, tablets, laptops and more in the near and far future.

    HTML5 will take more time to install in the market. The codecs wars is still here, the canvas perfs are horrible on phones and tablets, even the apple ones. Sure it will improve too, but only future will tell us if it’ll egal flash perfs.

    Today, Flash is still the best choice for :
    - Using the same code to make an app, then bring it to android, then to iphone, then in a tv, with a really small time
    - Making games (Accelerated graphics !);

    And today, HTML5 is the best choice for :
    - videos;
    -making website’s menus that were made in flash yesterday.

    You know what ? I think it will stay this way.

    0
  • Gabriel

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 04:16

    10

    Too bad, because I love to use the flash on my web sites … But new technologies make their way so we have to accept …

    Gabriel

    0
    • Stanley

      Sunday, June 12th, 2011 08:23

      13

      Yes agree. Me too is Flash addict and with the invention of Apple products, we moved to jQuery. This is the best thing of Web industry… Everyday new thing will come… we have to adept to it.

      0
  • Ray

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 08:27

    9

    A couple of sites I belong to that develop software scripts have mentioned moving away from flash programming. Although they didn’t get into a lot of detail. Maybe there is a new trend brewing. I can live with or without flash. Sometimes it is kind of nice and cool, other times it can be annoying, use a lot of pc resources and even freeze up. I messed with some flash programming a few years ago, and I thought it was confusing. So I leave most of that programming stuff to the pro’s now. It has been so popular for so long now that I really don’t see it disappearing any time soon.

    0
  • Shelle

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 00:58

    8

    Interesting read :)
    Have to say, I have not used Flash in years, the main reason for this being a strong focus on meeting accessibility requirements for the online content I work on, and although Flash has come a long way to meeting these standards, I avoid using/developing in Flash for online content as I have found it too time consuming to either try and make Flash accessible and/or also provide an accessible alternative to the Flash utlisied.
    Maybe Flash will be here to stay, but I think it will end up having a specific market and purpose, as opposed to being widely utilised as it has been in the past.

    0
  • Bill Robbins

    Sunday, June 12th, 2011 06:34

    7

    I’d be interested to know the percentage of the web sites above only use Flash for video or ads. Admittedly, I don’t play web based games so I rarely encounter Flash outside of video. If that’s all they need Flash for, swapping it for HTML5 video is easy.

    Personally for me, I’ve always loathed Flash from back in the day when it would take forever to load a full Flash site over a dial-up connection just to check a restaurant’s menu.

    0
    • kstagg

      Thursday, June 16th, 2011 21:15

      26

      “Personally for me, I’ve always loathed Flash from back in the day when it would take forever to load a full Flash site over a dial-up connection just to check a restaurant’s menu.”

      You’re referencing coding practices from the days of dial-up to today? Oh, come-on. Look at the stats at the top of this article, that will tell you what Flash is used for. Flash is a great tool, and for me, has always been stable, whether on my humble, dual-core 32-bit Windows 7 system at home or on my EVO 4G.

      It’s great knowing I can embed a flash element on a page knowing it will look the same in every browser. It’s a shame that the so-called monster machines from Apple can’t handle what my 3-yr old Windows hardware can do. Bummer.

      0
    • Lars

      Thursday, December 15th, 2011 18:57

      44

      “Personally for me, I’ve always loathed Flash from back in the day when it would take forever to load a full Flash site over a dial-up connection just to check a restaurant’s menu.”

      Yeah, and my great grandfather hated cars because they used to scare his horses. Thanks for the nostalgic trip. Just FYI… it’s 2012.

      0
  • czery

    Saturday, June 11th, 2011 12:42

    3

    By the way: There are a few good approaches for creating an HTML5 IDE like Tumult Inc.’s Hype (just OS X – Mac App Store) or Animatable (browser-based but not yet released – http://animatable.com/).

    0
  • czery

    Saturday, June 11th, 2011 12:39

    2

    Thanks for this great conclusion about the Flash vs. HTML5 topic. I read a lot about that in the past few weeks and I agree in most of the points you mention. But I think we have to differentiate between the technology itself and the development environment. Flash is both the technology but also the IDE, which allows to implement the technology very easily – and I agree that a clever 13-year-old could learn how to animate using the Flash IDE. However for me HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript are just the pure markup, layout description or scripting languages. So I think now it’s time for the software developers out there to create intuitive and easy to use IDEs for this languages to release their power and make them accessible to the non-programming designers and creative brains.

    0
    • Rean John Uehara

      Saturday, June 11th, 2011 13:17

      5

      Really great link you shared on the other comment (Animatable), I’m excited to see more of it in the future. Aye, your comment is better than the conclusion I wrote, I must admit. Thanks!

      0
    • Lee

      Thursday, November 10th, 2011 09:02

      36

      Nice of you to mention the Flash IDE. They have a long way to go in developing a rival development platform with SVGs, a graphical timeline integrated with scripting, vector tweens, etc. Flash is elegant. Also, too many designers such have myself, have worked long and hard at becoming fluent in the use of this IDE. So we’re not giving it up too easily.

      0
  • Puhi

    Saturday, June 11th, 2011 12:21

    1

    No way Flash will die. You didn’t even touch the fact that it is being used in video games development – not Flash games, but triple A titles. For example, a whole UI for a game we’re developing will be developed in Flash.

    0
    • Rean John Uehara

      Saturday, June 11th, 2011 13:08

      4

      I must admit, I didn’t know Flash is used for console/hardcore games. I focused too much on the web. :D Thanks!

      0
      • Rochester Oliveira

        Sunday, June 12th, 2011 06:29

        6

        Let’s say instead: ‘Flash, as we know, for web, is dead’.

        There is a couple of products that reinvented their focus and are still alive..

        BTW, Really well written, Rean.

        []‘s

        0

Comments are closed.

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