A Handy Guide to Better User Experience

Posted in Tips, Usability, Web Design • Posted on 3 Comments

In simplest terms, UX, also known as user experience or user usability is the way most basic users feel about using an application, a program, a website or anything. User Experience is based on the reactions and responses the user performs and provides. While it can seem related to gaining feedback, it is actually not the same. User Experience is meant to understand and make the user reach the “final goal” which is defined by the owner of the product. Whether this goal is getting the person to subscribe to your newsletter, or make him buy  your new t-shirt, the main goal of the owner is to make the user’s way as easy and hassle free as possible. There are many factors which can influence a user’s experience with your system/product. The following are some of the most important factors.

User’s Previous Experience and State

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User’s previous experience is probably the most important factor which can negatively affect your user’s experience with your product/system. There is simply no easy way you can teach an old man to play the latest Angry Birds game, if he sees it for the first time in his life. Same goes with user experience. While a lot of internet users are actually pretty familiar with many technologies (considering just the user side, not the internal/developer side), if you come up with something really fancy and awesome, something really unique, that there is no easy way you will get everyone in the audience using it as if they “were playing with it, since young age”. When deciding on any system, you must have the simplicity principle in mind as well. Overuse of elements may crush or lower your user-experience which will eventually lead to a loss of sales/customers etc.

System Properties

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You shouldn’t even bother about your user experience data if your system isn’t perfect… or at least near-perfection level. After the page has been reloaded, the rate of leavers is about 25% which is actually a quarter of the sales/subscribers/customers you could have achieved! Having a flawless product is really important. Many clicks in order to perform a single action, also force users to leave. No one is interested in browsing 3-4 pages in a row only for watching a video describing your service. The most important key point to keep in mind, regarding your system defections is: “Save their Time, and they will Save Yours”.

Small Details which make Big Differences

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There are several minor things which tend to create either big successes for you and your product or cause your unavoidable fail. Bounce Rate is a pretty important factor which must be taken into consideration. Bounce Rate refers to visitors who tend to leave the website before making any action, even browsing the homepage. Modern traffic analyzers, such as Google Analytics provide us such data, so we know exactly where is the problem with our system. Maybe you’ve built an extraordinary product, but you haven’t generated any sales which can create a lot of questions. It is very important that we analyze correctly the bounce rate data, so that we know exactly if there is a trouble with the system over-all or any page(s) in particular. Avinash Kaushik, a google analytics specialist says that a 35% bounce rate is concerning where a 50% bounce rate is actually worrying. User targeting is one of the most basic troubles related to bad UX. Incorrect targeting is a basic mistake which must not be performed by anyone who wishes a decent audience. You wouldn’t like to target teenagers to your site for selling car washing solutions or under-ages to websites about alcoholic drinks. This will not only make you lose your money (if you are advertising) but will also mess up all the bounce and traffic rates you may have.

Analyzing UX Elements and Details on Websites

Forms and Fields

Besides buttons, forms tend to be the most used UI elements in any website designs. You can basically see them on any website in any place: header, content area, sidebar, footer. They can be of any type and represent input fields for collecting info (such as subscribe forms), forms for messages, search forms, forms for comments etc. As you already know, our main goal is to make user experience as easy and understandable as possible. This is why, when working with forms, you should always keep in mind a few details which will make your forms more user-friendly and will help your users fill them without any problem.

Use Unified Text Fields

Unified text fields can actually be filled much faster than the regular, non-unified ones. The basic user tends to spend more time performing eye directions and imputing info from the side on regular fields, and in doing so, losing their precious time, which is definitely not our goal.

Plain Search Forms

A “button-less” search form allows users to perform easier searches. Many designers use plain forms for search, because they think that those will fit better into their designs, rather than forms with an addition of a button. It isn’t a good practice simply from the designers’ perspective; using plain/simple search forms actually makes your users perform easier site searches. Rather then imputing their search term by typing, then grabbing the mouse and performing one more click, you just let them skip 2 steps, which is again a time-saver!

Field Confirmations

One of the most UX-unfriendly situations is when you fill out a long form, after hitting refresh you actually realize you’ve imputed some wrong information. That’s where automatic field confirmations come really in handy. These types of confirmations usually flash an error message if the users have left any field blank, or any information is wrong: such as an email address without the ‘@’ symbol.

Navigation

It is a good UX practice to always set your links located on the top of your page, and especially if your navigation bar links open up in the same browser window. It is a well-known fact that you should only set external links to open in a new tab, and never let your internal links open up in a new tab or browser window as it may totally ruin your visitor’s stay on the site. A lot of people prefer links to be opened in the same tab, however, you can make an exception on external links, but never on your internal ones.

The Order of Placing Links in the Nav Bar

You have probably seen that all sites tend to put the “Home” link at the beginning of their navigation bar, and links which require action, such as “Contact Us” at the end of their link “row”. The placing of these links isn’t dummy or random — all of this has a specific logic and the user’s “ease of use” concept in mind. A lot of websites tend to put links in their navigation, either by their importance or by level of information offered. It is a common example to see the “Home” link followed by an “About Us” page because it is the starting point for offering information. The “About Us” page is usually followed by a “Portfolio” page or a “Know the Team” page, which is the 2nd informative page on most sites, after the “About Us”.

Conclusion

The key is to always think about how your users will perform. You should attempt to make their task as easy as possible, save their precious time, and try to achieve the most important goal you have: engage them!

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3 Comments
  • Shahid

    Friday, March 30th, 2012 09:32

    1

    Of course the User is only one which earn some amount for you and Yes for a Better UX we need a better Navigation support. But one Point i wanna mention don’t you think that the Drop down Menus and Some Good widgets are even the Best way to UX…?

    0
  • Carpediem

    Friday, March 30th, 2012 23:18

    2

    Hi, one aspect that I think bears taking into account is the “consistency” and “coherence” of the user experience.

    It is ok to introduce new radical innovations in the user experience that your target may have no experience with (think the current Ipod User Interface vis a vis when it was Clickwheel based)

    If you have the PR and marketing savvy of a Steve jobs to “educate” your market concerning the new user interface and experience innovation, great.

    But it is essential that throughout the user experience, there is a coherence and consistency in the application of the innovation; in other words, its ok if I have to learn a new trick, just make sure that it works throughout the user experience in a consistent fashion; just like with a novel or a movie, where we are willing to “suspend oiur disbelief”, as long as the rules and internal “story logic” are consistent.

    0
  • roger

    Sunday, April 1st, 2012 10:11

    3

    A very handy site. Log in, add your links and upload your most beautifull picture as a background.
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    0
  • roger

    Sunday, April 1st, 2012 10:11

    3

    A very handy site. Log in, add your links and upload your most beautifull picture as a background.
    internetfavs.com

    0
  • Carpediem

    Friday, March 30th, 2012 23:18

    2

    Hi, one aspect that I think bears taking into account is the “consistency” and “coherence” of the user experience.

    It is ok to introduce new radical innovations in the user experience that your target may have no experience with (think the current Ipod User Interface vis a vis when it was Clickwheel based)

    If you have the PR and marketing savvy of a Steve jobs to “educate” your market concerning the new user interface and experience innovation, great.

    But it is essential that throughout the user experience, there is a coherence and consistency in the application of the innovation; in other words, its ok if I have to learn a new trick, just make sure that it works throughout the user experience in a consistent fashion; just like with a novel or a movie, where we are willing to “suspend oiur disbelief”, as long as the rules and internal “story logic” are consistent.

    0
  • Shahid

    Friday, March 30th, 2012 09:32

    1

    Of course the User is only one which earn some amount for you and Yes for a Better UX we need a better Navigation support. But one Point i wanna mention don’t you think that the Drop down Menus and Some Good widgets are even the Best way to UX…?

    0

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