Ramit Sethi Explains How You Can Earn More Money As A Freelance Web Designer

Posted in Freelance, Interviews, Tips, Web Design • Posted on 11 Comments

Ramit Sethi is the New York Times best-selling author of I Will Teach You To Be Rich and the author of the popular personal finance blog www.iwillteachyoutoberich.com, which hosts over 250,000 readers per month. Ramit’s advice has been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, FORTUNE, NPR, ABC News and CNBC.  Ramit graduated from Stanford and co-founded PBwiki, a venture-backed startup.

Please introduce yourself to our readers.

My name is Ramit Sethi. I run a website called I Will Teach You To Be Rich. I wrote “The New York Times” best selling book “I Will Teach You To Be Rich”, which focuses on how to manage and automate your money using psychology and systems.. And for the last few years, I’ve been teaching people how to earn money on the side using the skills they already have (e.g. web designers, photographers, project managers..).

What is your own experience with freelancing?

My experience has been pretty varied:

I’ve freelanced as a writer.

I’ve freelanced as a marketing consultant.

I’ve done some freelance work for venture capital firms.

I’ve even freelanced as a private consultant.

Over the last few years, I’ve raised my rates from around 20$/hour to 3000$/hour.

Why did you decide to teach people about freelancing?

I didn’t plan to teach material on freelancing, but..

I went on a book tour on 2009. I visited a lot of different cities across the United States. In almost every single place that I went to I met my readers and asked them “What do you wish I wrote more about?”. Almost all of them said “I want to earn more money. Yeah, I want to invest and do all that stuff, but I also want to learn how to earn more money”.

I went back to my team and we started researching all the different ways to earn money (..negotiating a raise in your current job, getting a better job, freelancing, creating products and selling them online..) and from this research, as well as from my own experience, I think that freelancing is the most effective way to earn more money (especially on the side).

It’s also interesting, because a lot of people have this delusion of passive income. They believe “Oh, I don’t want to trade my time for money! I just want to make passive income!”, but if you ask these people “Alright, so how is it going, how much have you made?”, almost none of them had made any significant amount of money. However, with freelancing you can actually take your existing skills and earn a fairly significant amount of money, like many of my students who are earning thousands of dollars a month on the side while having full time jobs.

How exactly do you help your students who are web designers?

A lot of web designers feel frustrated. They’re getting these terrible clients who don’t want to pay and are saying things like “Why would I pay you, I can just go online to some theme site and get it for 20$”. They’re getting these terrible projects that require a ton of work for not that much money. Moreover, they spend most of their time chasing new clients. As you can see, it’s very frustrating for them.

What I help my students to do is to first narrow down who they’re targeting. Many web designers have a funny idea that they should target as many people as possible, cast the widest net, because then they can potentially get more clients, but, counter-intuitively, it’s much more effective to really narrow down who you’re going after.

I’ll give you an example. Let’s pretend that you’re a new mother. Let’s pretend that you just had a beautiful baby son and you want some photos taken of you and your new son. Who are you going to hire? Are you going to hire John Jones, who takes photos of babies, animals, barnyards and cars? Or are you going to hire Richard Johnson, who specializes in baby boys between the ages of one week and three months. Who are you going to hire? It’s obvious that you’re going to hire the person who specializes in that and you’ll be willing to pay more, because the second photographer understands all the particular unique challenges and ways to make a baby boy look beautiful.

The same thing is true in web design: if your client just wants a random web designer, that’s probably not a good client for you. It’s hard for people to get that it’s okay to say no to the wrong clients, but once you’ll really internalize this, you’ll be able to focus on better clients, work with fewer clients and charge them more.. And they will be happy to pay!

Agota’s note: Here’s a case study about one of Ramit’s students, a   20-something web designer Mike, who earned extra 6000$ in eight weeks by using some of the Ramit’s techniques.

Okay, so before we get into the freelancing stuff.. A lot of people, especially creative types, hold this belief that “money is evil”, which prevents them from earning more and living the life they deserve. What would you say to people who want to overcome this limiting belief?

My suggestion is:

Look, think about something that you have paid for that you love. Maybe it’s that lipstick you buy. Maybe it’s that restaurant you go out to. Maybe it’s somebody who helps you clean your apartment, or does your laundry, or makes the product you love, whatever. Think about how happy you feel when you pay. You know, there’s always one or two things in our lives that we’ll pay anything for, right? Well.. Why can’t that be you? Your clients will be delighted to pay you if you can help them solve their problems, make more money, save time or get more clients.

When we have these invisible beliefs we often believe that we’re cheating someone and that there’s only a limited amount of money in this world, so we’re taking it away from someone. However, if you’re actually helping your clients, if you’re putting them at the center of your business, you’re actually helping everyone create more. Not scarcity, abundance! You’re actually helping them get more clients, create more revenue, save more time. They’re happy to pass a small percentage of that to you. Get three really high value clients and watch and observe as they’re more than happy to pay you, because you are solving their problems.

Also, in order to conquer this limiting belief, study people who are successful and don’t surround yourself with people who think that money is evil.

..by the way, I cover this in a lot more details in my Chase Jarvis video, you can watch it here.

Okay, great, so back to freelancing.. Most people who have full time jobs and family responsibilities are crazy busy already and they don’t want a second job on top of all that. How can these people find time to freelance? Honestly, is it even realistic for them?

This is a great question.

In my research of over a hundred thousand people, when it comes to earning money, there are two biggest excuses that people have:

Excuse No.1: “I don’t have an idea. I don’t know what I should do to earn more money.”

Excuse No.2: “I don’t have time.”

Honestly, I don’t accept that excuse. Most people can easily scrape together 5-10 hours, even if they have families, even if they have full-time jobs. I’ll give you three ways how you can do it, three ways how you can freelance even if you have a family, even if you have a full time job:

1. Implementing The Retainer’s strategy.

One of my students, Dean Soto, actually has a very demanding full-time job in a technology industry, as well as a family with children. He didn’t want to take away from his family time, but he also knew that he wanted to earn a little bit more money to provide a better lifestyle for them. He took that Earn1k module on pricing, where we talk about how to charge in different ways, and he implemented The Retainer’s strategy. Now, what this does is he basically works with the best clients, who don’t need him at any particular time, they just want him to get things done. This way, Dean gets to come home from work, play with his family and still earn money on the side by spending about an hour every couple of nights working for his clients. He can do that early in the morning, he can do that late at night. His clients don’t care:they only want him to get things done. That allowed him to earn thousands and thousands of dollars. That’s one way, implementing The Retainer’s strategy.

2. Optimize your time.

The second way is to optimize your time. We teach this in Earn1k. Most of us waste hours and hours per day. HOURS! Did you know that the average American watches several hours of TV everyday? Needless to say, there are a lot of ways to optimize our time.

There’s a whole bunch of time management strategies that we outline, but in general, I’ll just say, could you find a way to save 30 minutes a day? Are there certain things you could do, for example, could you batch certain things, so you would do them all at once instead of spread out? Could you cut back on one thing that you’re doing that is not very productive? Could you wake up 30 minutes earlier? Maybe you could pay someone in order to outsource something that you do? Let’s assume you’re making 50$/hour (I’m just making up a number here). Paying someone 10$/hour to do the same thing, or to do, let’s say, your laundry, can be a very effective time arbitrage. So that’s No.2, optimizing your time.

3. Work for higher end clients.

This is what I push my students to do. Many of web designers reading this (I know, because I’ve spoken to so many) know that it can be really frustrating to have to spend hours and hours every day on a project when you’re only getting paid a tiny amount for the work that you’re doing and you’re not getting paid what you deserve. Well, part of the reason for that is that you’re working with the wrong clients. My students who are successful and go through the program find that they’re spending the same amount of time (or even less), yet making far more money. Why? Because they’re working with clients who are happy to pay them their asking rates. So, it all comes back to how you’re helping the right clients find success.

..so you’re saying that it’s possible to earn a decent amount of money with only 5-10 hours a week (decent being more than 100$/week) ?

Absolutely. Oh, much more, depending where you live, much more than 100$/week. My students are doing exactly that. You can see it for yourself here, it’s a list of some of my students who have earned a significant amount of money on the side.

Let’s get into “how-to” part. What is the very starting point for someone who has a full time job as a web designer and wants to start earning money on the side (..and maybe someday switch to full time freelancing)? What’s the very first thing to do?

Start by understanding what skills do you have that someone would be willing to pay for and who these people might be.

This is a big foundational thing that many people miss. They start off by saying “Oh, I have this idea, I’m gonna start by getting business cards and setting up a website!”. This stuff happens much later. What matters first is being able to find those clients that might pay and really talking to them, listening to them, finding out what their big challenges are. This is where customer research comes in.

This is why my students are able to charge so much: a lot of them go from charging 10$/hour or 15$/hour to charging over 100$/hour. The difference is that they start doing a really deep research. They ask questions like (let’s say they’re looking for web design clients): “Why do you want a web designer?”, “Have you already hired one in the past?”, “Did it work out?”, “Did it not work out?”.. They’ll also do a research on their market: “Who are the other designers who are doing what I want to do?”, “How much do they charge?”, etc. They’re not just walking and talking about their idea.

The client doesn’t care about you and your skills: the client cares about how can you help them hit their business goals. You need to focus on what THEY want and what you can do for THEM. You can use my Briefcase technique for that. Once you can do that, something amazing happens: price becomes a mere triviality. A lot of people are concerned: “Oh my God! How can I charge 25$/hour when everyone else is charging 10$/hour?!”. Well, when you can figure out what the clients want better than they know it themselves, you can charge a tremendous amount and the clients is actually happy to pay. Those are the first steps that you take.

How can web designers niche it down and define their ideal customers? How niche they should target?

That’s a great question. In general, they should niche it down more than they are. When I ask you “Who’s your ideal client?”, you can’t just say “Someone who needs a web page or a small business owners”. That doesn’t mean anything. That’s everyone. How are you supposed to find those small business owners?

However.. What if you said: “I want to find small business owners who run information product marketing companies, doing revenues between 100k – 1mil per year.”? Well, guess what? It’s much easier to find those people and, by the way, those people are willing to pay, because you have skills that can help them earn more revenue.

We have this technique called Pay Certainty technique when it comes to niching it down. It’s a very simple principle which you can use right now. You know how a lot of web designers don’t know who they’re serving, so they’re just serving everyone? Or you have web designers who will say: “Oh, I want to go do web design for non-profits”..and they almost never make any money? That’s because they haven’t used something like this.

Here’s what web designers can use right away:

I’ll come to you and I’ll say: “Who’s your customer?”

You say: “I want to serve non-profits who want a new web design”.

Okay, great, we have two questions to ask:

1. Do they have the ability to pay?

2. Do they have the willingness to pay?

Let’s try to test this. Do the non profit clients have the ability to pay? No! They really don’t’ have that much money, so probably not. Do they have the willingness to pay? No! They don’t want to pay someone for web design, really. They want to trade or barter or just get it for free. So they fail the pay certainty technique.

..but what if you say: “Hey, I want to find a company who needs an improved design, they’re a small business in an automobile industry and they need an improved design to sell more cars. Oh, and they do revenue between 100k – 500k a year.”. Do they have an ability to pay? Yes, they make 500k a year. Do they have the willingness to pay? Yes, they want to make more money! They’re willing to pay a little bit. THAT is how you start niching it down..and that’s how you spend less time getting more clients.

What would you say to people who are just starting out as freelancers and are afraid to lose opportunities/lose customers by niching it down and think that they should take everything that comes their way?

It’s a classic fear and it’s one of the quickest reasons why most web designers don’t really earn what they should.

My simple answer is: try. Try it for one or two months and see if it works. Just try it, if it works, great! However, if it doesn’t work, if you find it challenging to find clients who are willing to pay what you’re asking and you find it difficult to raise your rates, then perhaps it would make sense to try a different way.

I can tell you that this isn’t just something that I’ve used, this is a classic marketing principle and thousands of my students have also used it to earn significant amounts of money. It seem counter-intuitive, because you’re saying “No” to people, but..

Think about it in a different way . Think about as if you are looking for a relationship. Do you just go out and say: “I want to marry EVERYBODY!” or are you a little bit more selective? You don’t go after anyone who has two eyes and a nose. You say, “You known, I’ve certain values, certain things that I look for in a man or a woman”. You try to find out whether you are a good fit for each other. I think so many web designers try to focus on everyone instead of focusing on the right people because they lack self-esteem, as well as marketing skills.

..by the way, I do this with my own courses. One thing I do is I don’t try to appeal to anyone: I actually don’t allow people who have a credit card debt to join my flagship courses. Almost nobody does that. Not allowing people with a credit card debt join my courses costs me hundreds of thousands dollars per years.

I do this because of these two reasons:

1. I think it’s the right thing to do. I don’t think that people with my credit card debt should be joining my very expensive courses. I think they should use my book or my free material to pay off their debt first.

2. It shows people that I don’t want everyone’s business, I just want the right business. When you do that, you actually stand for far more than just money..And, ironically, you can actually charge much higher rates by focusing on the right people.

You always say “Get your first 3 paying clients!”. How can web designers do that? How do you actually go and get those clients?

There are three most important things:

1. Eliminate time wasters.

So many web designers just waste their time. They do things like get on Twitter, create a Facebook page and make business cards. How does any of those things help you get clients? They don’t. In most cases, none of these things help you get clients.

You think client is going to randomly find your Twitter page and then decide to pay you thousands of dollars? That’s not how it works. I know, I have over 30 000 Twitter followers. So, eliminate time wasters and focus only on the things that are going to get you your first three paying clients. When you start setting something up, ask yourself: “Is this going to help me get 3 paying clients?”. No? Skip it. Do it later.

..for example, a lot of people want to build a massive website that’s going to take them three months. Skip it! You can set up a simple page or not even have a website. Well, web designers probably need websites and they need portfolios, but for other folks, they don’t need that. Do you really need business cards or can you just point them to your website? You get the idea.

2. Do your homework.

Many people are guilty of what I call the “I, I, I” syndrome. They walk up to their clients and say “I can do this, I can do that..”. The client doesn’t care about you. They care about themselves, so what can you do to help them? Have you studied their business? Have you already come up with a list of suggestions of how you can help them?

One of the most powerful ways to get a client is this: you walk into a meeting, ask about their challenges and then pull out a sheet of proposals that you’ve made from studying their website. This is called The Briefcase technique.. And it has closed people massive contracts.

3. Reach out to them directly.

Don’t wait for them to come to you, go to them!

Once you’ve identified your clients ( as in “Information product marketers who are doing 100k-1mil in revenue every year”,etc.), then you know where to find them, what they read, what sites they are on.. You can reach out to them directly and say:

“Hey, I’m a web designer, I wanted to see if there’s any possibility of me helping you out with few things, I’m more than willing to give you some suggestions on how to improve your copy..by the way, I have done this for another clients, who recorded a 55% increase in revenue.”.

Whoa, that’s pretty compelling! The clients will definitely take your call and now you can talk to them, listen to them and perhaps make some suggestions.

That’s how you can go about getting your first three clients.

..by the way, there was this concept of features vs. benefits which has helped me tremendously in getting new clients. Maybe you can explain it to our readers?

Most people focus on features.

They say: “Here’s what you get with my web design service: you get a hosting account, you get ten pages design, you get this, you get that”.

Well.. The client doesn’t care!

What do the clients want fundamentally? They want to make more money, they want to get more clients, they want to spend less time, they just want it handled.. You can find this out by talking to them and doing research.

..by the way, this is a survey that I actually used to drive well over a 100k in revenue, your readers can check it out here.

This is where you start doing your homework. You figure out what it is that they want and use it to present your services as a benefit. So, instead of saying “You get 10 web pages”, you say: “Look, my goal is to help you increase the number of subscribers by 25%” or, better yet, “My goal is to help you increase the revenue by 15%”. That is a benefit. Nobody cares about how many pages it is, or how much time you’re going to spend on it or what software you’ll use. They don’t care about all that. They want more money, more clients, in less time. Focus on what THEY want, not what you want.

Many freelancers find it very challenging to decide what to charge for their services. When to work for free, when to charge and what to charge?

Let’s start by talking about working for free.

You know, I actually believe that working for free can be great if you do it for the right reasons. I’ve worked for free for many people and it has helped to accelerate my career a lot, but..

We’re all too well aware how often creative people get taken advantage of. You know, they’ll go and work for someone for free and they’ll get nothing out of it. Moreover, the free guy wants more and more and more and he gets mad when you don’t deliver. It doesn’t make any sense. So, here’s what I would suggest..

Here are a couple of good reasons to work for free:

1. When you want to build up a portfolio.

Here’s what you can say:

“You know, I normally charge 75$/hour, but I really like your project and right now I’m looking to build a portfolio, so I’m happy to work on this for free for two weeks. All I ask is if in at the end of those two weeks I do an extraordinary job, that we discuss going back to my normal rate”.

That’s a good way of positioning yourself as a trusted high end provider, but also doing some free work to let them see how good you are.

2. When you want to work for someone who’s a connector.

A connector is someone who you might do some free work while you tell them upfront:

“Look, I’m willing to work for free, but my goal is if I do an extraordinary job for you, I’d like you to recommend me to three of your friends”.

People have actually done that for me and I’ve sent them so much business that they didn’t know what to do with it. The same thing for some other of my friends, somebody worked for them for free, these connectors connected them to multiple clients. However, you always have to be upfront.

..so you’re saying that it’s better NOT to work for free indefinitely, without that upfront agreement?

Correct.

Okay, so the next thing is how much you should charge.

You can find this out by finding out what your competition is charging. Again, if you think that your competition is every web designer in the world, you have to go much narrower than that. It pays to know who your competition is and what they’re charging. I explain how to do this in my Earn1k course.

Also, focus on the value. For example, if you come to me and say: I’m going to increase your sales by 15%”, you can charge me anything!.. and I’ll pay it, as long as you actually deliver. So, the better you are, the more examples of successes you have in the past, the more you can charge.

Let me just put it this way: I told you what my hourly rate is, right? I’m not charging that to everybody, in fact, I turn away a lot of people who can actually afford that, because I only work with people who I think I can add a lot of value to.

Think of your favorite restaurant. The restaurant where you go and there’s always a line at the door. They probably could squeeze in few more tables, but they don’t, because they don’t care about serving everyone, they want to only serve the clientele they want.

When you start positioning yourself as that, not just a commodity designer, but someone who these clients are lucky to have because you’re so skilled at what you do, then you can start at the top of that range to let them see how good you are.

You’ve mentioned that you’ve increased your own rates significantly over the last few years. How can freelancers increase their rates over time? I bet a lot of people are scared to raise their rates.

It’s interesting how many of the questions are about fear, isn’t it?

There’s fear in charging a reasonable rate, there’s fear in raising our rates, there’s fear in focusing on niche customers and turning away other clients.. However, fear is not a good way to run your freelancing career.

The very best freelancers know precisely who they are targeting and they’re very comfortable with saying “You know what, you’ re probably not the right fit for me”. Isn’t it interesting that so many web designers run their careers instead of actually studying people who have done it really well?

I mean.. Let’s just challenge you: when was the last time that your freelancing friends systematically studied the best freelancers in their field:talked to them, took them out for coffee, studied their websites to learn how they charge and position.. When was the last time they did that?

..I think they haven’t done that all..

Yes. They’re governed by fear instead. It’s not a good way to go through life and certainly not a good way to go through your career.

Here’s my suggestion how to raise your rates over time:

I had a young woman who worked for me. She started by doing some pretty basic stuff, but over time, she was so good at what she did that she started asking me: “Hey, what else are you doing, what else is going on in your business, how else can I help?” and she started doing several other things. Over time she added so much value to my business that of course I ended up paying her more, I ended up paying her tens of thousands of dollars more. Why? Because she added value to me, the client. She made my life easier and she showed the ROI.

Here’s something I want to say to freelancers and web designers in particular: you’re not just designers, you’re solving their problems. So, for example, if you find that they need help with their copy writing, either you can do it or you can refer them to someone who can. You’re solving their problems. Maybe they need help setting up and e-mail management software. You say: “Oh great, I know how to use Aweber” (or whatever you can), set that up and of course charge them. They’re happy to pay. Remember, you’re not tricking them. They’re happy to pay. Somebody who talks about it very well is a guy named Jay Abraham, he’s one of my mentors, he says: “Don’t just talk about YOUR services, put THE CLIENT at the center”. So, if they need something, figure out if you can offer it or if you know someone who can. After you do this time and time again, your client will think about you as their problem solver .. And that is an enviable position to be in.

Is there a way to systematically expand your client base once you got your first 3 paying clients in order to make sure that there’s always freelance work available?

There’s a way. It takes a lot of work, but there is a way.

The best freelancers I know always have a waiting list of clients. They actively turn people down, because they’re not the right fit, or they’re not willing to pay, or they just don’t have time. Now, I don’t want this to sound intimidating, because if you’re first starting out, it can seem insane to have a waiting list of clients. However, all of this are simple steps taken day after day and applied systematically. So, how do you do that?

1. You get those 3 paying clients.

2. You decide whether you want to charge your existing clients more or you want to get more clients.

3. You ask your clients for referrals. “Hey, I just did a terrific job, helped you increase sales by 15%, or helped you to hit that deadline on time, I’d like you to introduce me to 3 other clients, can you help me with that? I’d really appreciate it.”

That’s how you get more clients.

There are several other sophisticated ways, like partnerships, referrals, constant lead generation, etc. Anyway, there are plenty of ways to get more clients once you got 3, 5, 7, clients. It’s actually much easier to go from 10 to 20 clients than to 1 to 3 clients. We cover all this in Earn1k.

Talking about clients.. Many freelancers, especially those who are just starting out, waste a lot of time and energy working for really bad clients. Is there a way to know in advance that a client is going to be a time waster? What are the danger signs?

Well, first of all, a lot of creatives get taken advantage of by people and yes, we can blame them, but really, we need to blame ourselves. When was the last time someone in a creative world, like web designers or photographers, actually took time to learn how the business works? Instead ,a lot of creatives insist “Oh, I just need to get better at my craft and then the money will come”.. Well, that’s not how it works! I made these mistakes too, but if you simply expect the right clients to find you.. That’s not how the world works. That’s why I teach what I teach: I’m so frustrated of creative people getting taken advantage of.

Here are three ways how you can recognize and avoid bad clients:

1. Observe whether the client is clear about the project.

Bad clients often spend enormous amounts of time talking about the project instead of actually focusing on what needs to be done.

What I suggest is that you have a very clear questionnaire and a set of guidelines for your potential clients. This actually comes from studying the most successful freelancers. The best people have limited time, so they ask potential clients to fill out a questionnaire which shows that a client is serious. Don’t get on the phone for no good reason, just to chat about the project!

2. Mention the ballpark of certain work you’ve done in the past.

It’s okay to mention the work you’ve done in the past and what you’ve charged for it, because if you are charging 15 000$ for a project and the client has 500$ budget in mind, you need to find that out relatively soon. It doesn’t mean that you have to put it on your website or that you need to ask about it on your first call, but you need to be honest with them about the type of work you do.

3. Be very clear about what you’re going after.

It always comes back to your clients. Are you going after anyone? Or are you using things like Pay Certainty technique to eliminate 90% of time wasters and find people who have the ability and willingness to pay? When you can do that, you’re working with a much smaller group of people who are way more qualified.

I’ll give you a simple example:

I have 300 000 readers a month. However, when I did a  launch a couple of years ago, I made something like 80% of my revenue from my small list of 2000 people.

Let me say this again: I have 300 000 readers a month, but when I did this launch, I made 80% of my revenue from my small list of 2000 people.

In other words, going after the right people can be dramatically more effective than going after everyone.

I bet quite a few people would love to eventually become full-time freelancers. How can someone go from having a full time job and freelancing on the side to freelancing full time?

Good question.

I love the idea of freelancing on the side because it’s not as risky as jumping out and starting something on your own. I think that if you have a full-time job, it’s a great idea to spend little more time getting some clients on the side, because you can actually de-risk your own situation. Think about it: if you have a full time job and you’re fired or laid off, that’s it, it’s 100% of your income. However, a lot of my students have 4,5,6 sources of income, so even if they’re laid off, they still have have revenue coming through the door.. Also, they can still manage their time very well, because they’re working with their best clients and putting in as much time as they want.

Here are the three things I’d suggest in regards to making the transition from having a full time job and freelancing on the side to becoming a full time freelancer:

1. Get more clients.

I want to de-risk my situation before I make the jump from a full time job to a full time freelancing. That means I want multiple clients: not one, not two, but three or more clients paying regularly.

2.Have money in the bank.

I want to have money in the bank. I want at least a few months worth of money for those cold winter days, because sometimes you just don’t have any clients, so what are you going to do? You need some savings.

3. Make sure there’s a consistent upwards trajectory.

Well, if I only had three clients for the last six months and I can’t get a fourth one, that’s not a good situation. I want to get more and more clients paying more and more to me and me delivering more and more value, because that means that I really understand how to get more clients and deliver more value.

Last, but not least, maybe you could tell our readers a little bit more about your course on freelancing? Who is it for and who it is not for? What they should expect? Where they can find more information about it?

“When I went on tour to promote by book, the question readers asked again and again, in every city, was ‘How can I earn more money?’

I committed to teaching my readers the system I used to make money on the side and raise my rates to $3,000 an hour.

Like successful personal finance, the way to earn more money on the side is to follow a step-by-step system that other freelancers and businesses have already proved works.

I developed my course to help people to get their first three clients and earn $1,000 a month on the side because I knew from my psychology research those first steps were the hardest.

Since then, I’ve tested the course on thousands of students who followed the steps to earn more money, pay off debt, and even quit their day jobs and go into work for themselves.

If you want to learn more, check out http://earn1k.com/ where I give away my Idea Generator Tool and show people how to take the first steps toward making extra money on the side. The tool is free if you subscribe to my newsletter.”

Thank you very much for sharing your insights with us, Ramit!

16 Written Articles

Agota is a digital nomad who makes a living writing. She has a hard time staying in one place and loves slow travel. As a result, over the last five years, she has lived in United Kingdom, Spain, and Greece, where she's currently staying for the summer. Agota believes that travel is a great way to learn more about yourself and about the world, and that pretty much anyone can afford it if they set their mind to it.

11 Comments Best Comments First
  • M.Aswad Mehatb

    Saturday, May 26th, 2012 06:17

    3

    This is a great interview, I learned alot just by reading this , Amazing facts and tips..keep it up !!

    Thanks

    0
  • Bill K

    Friday, May 25th, 2012 11:39

    1

    Wow! I really enjoyed this article. I read articles all the time on this subject, but this one really hit home. It was awakening to me. I have been working full time and freelancing for years. It made me really think about what types of clients I should be going after. In addition, I like how the article says “we are solving their problems”. Simple, but to the point. Thanks for sharing…love the site!

    Bill

    0
  • Martin

    Friday, May 25th, 2012 12:46

    2

    I took this course and would recommend it to anyone that wants to give it a shot.

    This is one of the most extensive interviews that I’ve ever seen anywhere.

    I just want to add that investing in a course like this totally beats blindly chasing passive income. Instead of trying to “make money while you sleep,” why not make real money first?

    0
  • Robert

    Sunday, May 27th, 2012 06:27

    4

    It’s great to hear Ramit talks about Freelancing and Designing. Many people are lured by the power of getting money quickly from the Internet, but they don’t know that it requires times and efforts to take you to the top. One of the most extensive and inspirational interview I’ve ever read

    0
  • Perjan

    Thursday, May 31st, 2012 07:45

    7

    This guy is soo right. I will try to implement these things with my clients starting from today.

    Thanks a lot.

    0
  • Fahad Shakeel

    Tuesday, June 5th, 2012 02:36

    11

    It is one of the best article I have ever studied on this topic. Simple yet effective techniques to get good clients. I wish I could apply these all practically. Keep it up!!!

    0
  • saurabh saxena

    Monday, June 4th, 2012 22:17

    10

    Amazing Interview. Learned Alot.
    Thank you.

    0
  • Puneet

    Monday, June 4th, 2012 06:31

    9

    Superb Article …. i have designed 8 websites as a freelancer out of which many clients where time wasters ..they dint have enough content about their company , instead they asked me to write something about their company !!

    0
  • jimmy

    Tuesday, May 29th, 2012 18:30

    5

    what a crap, help yourself and god will help you

    -1
    • Dainis Graveris

      Tuesday, May 29th, 2012 19:35

      6

      In general you’re right, but let’s see how far you can get with that thinking without good actions.

      -1
    • agota

      Thursday, May 31st, 2012 12:33

      8

      I’m more than happy to interview you on this site if you have better advice on freelancing,drop me an e-mail anytime..

      P.S. It will be hard to beat Ramit on this though, especially considering his track record of helping thousands of people around the world (myself included) to earn decent money as freelancers.. :P

      0
  • Fahad Shakeel

    Tuesday, June 5th, 2012 02:36

    11

    It is one of the best article I have ever studied on this topic. Simple yet effective techniques to get good clients. I wish I could apply these all practically. Keep it up!!!

    0
  • saurabh saxena

    Monday, June 4th, 2012 22:17

    10

    Amazing Interview. Learned Alot.
    Thank you.

    0
  • Puneet

    Monday, June 4th, 2012 06:31

    9

    Superb Article …. i have designed 8 websites as a freelancer out of which many clients where time wasters ..they dint have enough content about their company , instead they asked me to write something about their company !!

    0
  • Perjan

    Thursday, May 31st, 2012 07:45

    7

    This guy is soo right. I will try to implement these things with my clients starting from today.

    Thanks a lot.

    0
  • jimmy

    Tuesday, May 29th, 2012 18:30

    5

    what a crap, help yourself and god will help you

    -1
    • Dainis Graveris

      Tuesday, May 29th, 2012 19:35

      6

      In general you’re right, but let’s see how far you can get with that thinking without good actions.

      -1
    • agota

      Thursday, May 31st, 2012 12:33

      8

      I’m more than happy to interview you on this site if you have better advice on freelancing,drop me an e-mail anytime..

      P.S. It will be hard to beat Ramit on this though, especially considering his track record of helping thousands of people around the world (myself included) to earn decent money as freelancers.. :P

      0
  • Robert

    Sunday, May 27th, 2012 06:27

    4

    It’s great to hear Ramit talks about Freelancing and Designing. Many people are lured by the power of getting money quickly from the Internet, but they don’t know that it requires times and efforts to take you to the top. One of the most extensive and inspirational interview I’ve ever read

    0
  • M.Aswad Mehatb

    Saturday, May 26th, 2012 06:17

    3

    This is a great interview, I learned alot just by reading this , Amazing facts and tips..keep it up !!

    Thanks

    0
  • Martin

    Friday, May 25th, 2012 12:46

    2

    I took this course and would recommend it to anyone that wants to give it a shot.

    This is one of the most extensive interviews that I’ve ever seen anywhere.

    I just want to add that investing in a course like this totally beats blindly chasing passive income. Instead of trying to “make money while you sleep,” why not make real money first?

    0
  • Bill K

    Friday, May 25th, 2012 11:39

    1

    Wow! I really enjoyed this article. I read articles all the time on this subject, but this one really hit home. It was awakening to me. I have been working full time and freelancing for years. It made me really think about what types of clients I should be going after. In addition, I like how the article says “we are solving their problems”. Simple, but to the point. Thanks for sharing…love the site!

    Bill

    0

Comments are closed.

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